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LLeonard

Petrified Dino Poo?

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LLeonard

Attached pictures are of a stone I discovered in our garden after receiving a load of landscape rock, believe they cam from Colorado.

 

This particular stone is shaped like a road apple left by a horse.   It is domed with a flat side like, as I said, a road apple left by a horse.  Some of the surfaces are similar to a hard gray shell; while those areas where the shell has broken away are loosely packed red, black and clear crystalyn material that crumbles easily from the stone with light touch of the finger.

 

Any ideas?

 

 

 

Edited by LLeonard
photos not included

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GeschWhat

Can you post a close up of the surface and the broken crumbly area please?

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Carl

Welcome to the Forum! Sorry, doesn't look like a coprolite to me. Lacks most of the details one would want to see for it to be one.

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ynot

Really need more pictures from other angles.

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GeschWhat
37 minutes ago, Carl said:

Welcome to the Forum! Sorry, doesn't look like a coprolite to me. Lacks most of the details one would want to see for it to be one.

You are right. It does remind be a bit of the specimens discussed here:

I keep hoping for herbivore coprolites to turn up. 

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Carl
2 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

You are right. It does remind be a bit of the specimens discussed here:

I keep hoping for herbivore coprolites to turn up. 

Me too!

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LLeonard

Dino Poo 1, 2 are videos of spot on the stone that flaked off and Poo 3 is a video of the back side of the flake. (Videos were taken with a Carson/zOrb 35x Digital Microscope.)

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MrbN7fxhsQCdJFIiOiJrcXR49C2cWF-t/view?usp=drive_web

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1D9DYtJ3_HUbThDaFex2w7Q5aV__pkyr3/view?usp=drive_web

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/14dpQXRejxLsg6z72Pw7puFapKnMeaYMs/view?usp=drive_web

Edited by LLeonard

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GeschWhat

Microscopic photos would be better. I wasn't able to view the 3rd video (permissions?). From what I could see, it looked very shiny. Was it wet? If not, it looked like it contained mica. That is not something you would see (or should I say not something I have seen) in coprolites.

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LLeonard
GeschWhat

Can you please post the photos directly on the the thread rather than providing links?

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LLeonard

I tried that, the forum wont permit direct posting of large files.

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GeschWhat

Can you try editing them to make them smaller?

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daves64

Actually I think she meant using paint to resize them. Right click on the image and select Edit, then Resize to make them smaller. It reduces the size & the "weight". A 6 mb picture can be reduced down to less than 300 kb without losing much in image quality. You can also crop the images in Paint as well (removing excess image clutter from outside the subject itself).

 

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supertramp
Maybe you have a piece of poorly cemented grus, 
resulting from chemical and mechanical weathering of a crystalline (granitoid?) rock, 
or a chunk of hightly weathered crystalline rock, which would give the same macroscopic result.

https://www.google.it/search?q=grus+geology&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjAwrf8uKDcAhWJ66QKHeb4CLIQ_AUICigB&biw=1517&bih=705

 


 

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