Jump to content

What happened to this ammonite?


Recommended Posts

I bought this ammonite online, found in the gault clay of Folkestone, Kent, and it has some unusual markings on it. I can't tell if they're from before or after death or if they might be bite marks. There is what looks like a pyrite deposit in the dent and I was wondering if anyone could tell me more! Below are some pictures.

20180712_073905[1].jpg

20180712_073940[1].jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks as if most of the outer whirls are broken off.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum. :)

 

Not seeing a bite/pathology here - broken, crushed and weathered, maybe.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This looks like it.might be just weathering as the ammonite was exposed to the elements.  However, damage to this area of the shell can also occur when crabs would break through the back of the living chamber to get at organic material after the ammonite died.

 

Don

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilsAnonymous
40 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

Welcome to the Forum. :)

 

Not seeing a bite/pathology here - broken, crushed and weathered, maybe.

I agree with weathered. All natural.

Check these English bitten ammonites out

https://goo.gl/images/C2VAj8

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

It lived, it loved, it died,  got buried, got fossilized and then it was found and sold to You.

 

Welcome to TFF!

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, FossilsAnonymous said:

I agree with weathered. All natural.

Check these English bitten ammonites out

https://goo.gl/images/C2VAj8

I noticed that the damage to Marlowe's ammonite is entirely in the phragmocone, as there are suture lines on either side of the damaged area.  This is inconsistent with feeding damage and supports natural weathering.

 

The paper you linked looks interesting, but it is behind a pay wall except for the abstract and one figure.  The damage in the figure seems to be very similar to damage ascribed to crab scavenging by other authors.  I wonder if they considered this possibility, or on what basis they decided against that explanation.

 

Don

 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it was crushed and weathered to me. 

 

RB

Link to post
Share on other sites

It does appear to be notched, left side first photo, as well as crushed. Whether bitten, crushed, or trampled it can only be conjecture what may have happened unless a tooth remains embedded. I have fossils which I think have evidence of being bitten. Fun to think about, hard to prove.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This recently published book is only available in German, but perhaps it will be translated into English someday. At any rate it goes into great detail on recognizing and defining Paleopathology, including predator injuries, so I figured it's nevertheles worth posting a link to the download:

 

Helmut Keupp: Atlas zur Paläopathologie der Cephalopoden

 

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't find anything in the book resembling this ammonite but I have discovered a lot about others I have, it's a very interesting book -just a shame it's all in German!

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a couple options for translation. I haven't tried them but curious to know how they work for you(if you want to try).

 

http://smallbusiness.chron.com/convert-pdf-german-english-57186.html

 

https://itstillworks.com/convert-pdf-german-english-6653882.html

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...
4 hours ago, Marlowe said:

could anyone tell me what species it is?

I'm afraid I'm not familiar enough with gault clay ammonites, which I'm assuming this is, going by your earlier post here, but maybe this may be of help to you.           

 

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it's not from the Gault Clay then?

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Bobby Rico may know the genus.

 

You mentioned it has pyrite where the damage is. We have pyrite here and often the pyrite oxidizes and that part of the fossil is lost. It just turns into a fine iron rust and disintegrates into dust.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @KimTexan Kim 

No idea but I have looked though my books and asked a friend. The venter has strangely odd ribbing . Guessing either epihoplites or pos the very rare Neophlycticeras .   

 

 

 

2557386F-D83F-470E-8750-0124CE83429E.jpeg

7B367C51-B457-4DF6-8FCE-D84C5FB61052.jpeg

D5B5586E-0759-42A3-A7E8-0DB9E516FD8D.jpeg

408D5C85-CAF9-4EB5-AB61-8F8DA84D2AD6.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

In answer to your question "What happened to this ammonite?"

 

You might want to sit down.

I am sorry to have to tell you this,

It died!

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/10/2018 at 5:46 PM, Bobby Rico said:

epihoplites or pos the very rare Neophlycticeras .   

What did you think.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
David in Japan
9 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

What did you think.

 

Lot of Hopplites in Gault Argiles. I think it is a good think to search is that direction but the keel seems different form Epihoplites and Neophlycticeras.

 

I will look in my books this evening to see if I can find something too.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...