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I_gotta_rock

If you want snails, go to Matoaka!

1. Euspira heros

2. Ecphoras - meganae (Left and right) and gardeneras (center)

3. Scaphella virginiana

4. Busycontypus sp. -anyone know which one?

5.Siphonalia devexa

6.Busycon spiringer

 

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I_gotta_rock

Panopeas with dental pick for scale. 

Large ones are P. americana.

Small ones are P. goldfussii

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I_gotta_rock

Glossus marylandica

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I_gotta_rock

Stewartia formani -- all three are complete pairs, though chipped in places.

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Innocentx

Great exposures equal fun times, especially when they're fresh. Merry Christmas!

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I_gotta_rock

Mussel shells - Mytilus sp.

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I_gotta_rock

Balanus concavus

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I_gotta_rock

bones

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I_gotta_rock

Who can make a report about Calvert Cliffs without shark teeth? These are my daughter's finds for the week. She is a shark tooth magnet. Sand shark, tiger shark, lemon shark, snaggletooth shark, at least one angel shark , and at least one mini megalodon in there somewhere.

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I_gotta_rock

Busycon spiringer

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ynot

Nice report, neat fossils!

Thanks for sharing.

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WhodamanHD

Nice finds! A productive week indeed! Your daughter did great as well, I like that little red hemi in the box. Wait a minute there are multiple species of Ecphora at Matoaka? Smells like a whole lotta new labels. I can never tell the differences. I like that I can call the new one a meg though:D

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Monica

Marvelous molluscs! (I like snails, too :))

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I_gotta_rock
22 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Nice finds! A productive week indeed! Your daughter did great as well, I like that little red hemi in the box. Wait a minute there are multiple species of Ecphora at Matoaka? Smells like a whole lotta new labels. I can never tell the differences. I like that I can call the new one a meg though:D

Yesterday's at least two different species and they are hard to tell apart. They both have four ribs at the center and generally the same shape. E. gardenera has higher ribs than its counterpart. If you can find a copy of this book through interlibrary loan somewhere, he has a whole CD (and if you can still read such things!) about Ecphoras. https://www.google.com/search?client=tablet-android-asus&sa=X&q=Molluscan+Paleontology+of+the+Chesapeake+Miocene&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAONgFuLSz9U3MK00MM7LU-LRT9c3NErKM8hNqSrXEnAsLcnILwrJd8rPz_bPy6kEAACc2eYuAAAA&ved=0ahUKEwjh35aYiaLcAhWmUt8KHVpSAycQxA0IUTAF&biw=1280&bih=800

 

This is another good one:

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=20113317783

Edited by I_gotta_rock
Added some book suggestions

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WhodamanHD
13 minutes ago, I_gotta_rock said:

Yesterday's at least two different species and they are hard to tell apart. They both have four ribs at the center and generally the same shape. E. gardenera has higher ribs than its counterpart.

Is E. quadricostrata ever found on the cliffs? I think that E. gardenerae gardenerae took its place but I’m not sure, a fossil hunting friend of mine always calls the four ribbed ones quadricostrata

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I_gotta_rock
11 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Is E. quadricostrata ever found on the cliffs? I think that E. gardenerae gardenerae took its place but I’m not sure, a fossil hunting friend of mine always calls the four ribbed ones quadricostrata

I think that is the old name. The great irony about scientific names is that they were intended to be a universal way to identify something, but the names charge constantly. Every time I identify something official, I have to double check online to see if the name in whatever obscure tome mentions it is still the current name. 

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Al Dente
40 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Is E. quadricostrata ever found on the cliffs? I think that E. gardenerae gardenerae took its place but I’m not sure, a fossil hunting friend of mine always calls the four ribbed ones quadricostrata

Ecphora gardnerae is Miocene, Ecphora quadracostata is found in the Pliocene.

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Kimi64

Hello Igota, that was me that you met on the beach right after you found one of your Ecphoras. I am off this week, so planning on going back tomorrow morning. Can't wait!

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Darktooth

Great finds! I am glad that you and you daughter had such a productive hunt! 

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MeargleSchmeargl

Great variety!

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Nimravis

Shells are great- I love collecting them.

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FranzBernhard

Great site, great fossils, great report!

Thanks for sharing!
Franz Bernhard

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I_gotta_rock
On ‎7‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 6:37 PM, Al Dente said:

Ecphora gardnerae is Miocene, Ecphora quadracostata is found in the Pliocene.

 Correct. Now. In Dall, 1830 all of them were quadracostata. They were divided out. The Miocene ones were renamed in Ward and Gilinski, 1988. I am missing my Ecphora book, but I believe E. megane megane is now an index fossil for the Drum Cliff member of the Choptank Formation.  E. gardenerae gardenarae is from a different member of the same formation. The latter was fopund on the beach. The former I pulled out of the matrix.

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