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MeargleSchmeargl

Rarity of scallops with both valves attached

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MeargleSchmeargl

Over the course of this year learning about the Tivola Limestone, the more I've inexplicably wanted an in-situ Eocene scallop. I've seen before that scallops with both valves attached at the hinge have been found, but how rare is such a phenomenon?

 

Something like this:

post-11133-0-68145600-1362698650.thumb.jpg.4f2159ebb156dcfbe61bb741319e777b.jpg

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goatinformationist

I have seen boxfuls of full scallops from Ruck's Pit in Fort Drum, Florida.  I've kept a few myself.

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Herb

most do not stay together, depends on the fossilization method (ie.. Rucks pit)

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Ludwigia

I guess you could basically say that when they are buried rapidly after their demise, then the chances that the valves stay together are much better than when they've been lying on the sea floor or in the surf on the beach for a long time, since the soft tissue which holds them together decomposes relatively quickly.

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WhodamanHD

I haven’t been actively looking for them, but I’ve found one scallop with both valves in the Choptank formation. I’ve seen many other shelled critters with both valves though.

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