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FunkyMonkey

Shark tooth - Walton on the Naze, Essex, UK

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FunkyMonkey

Hi there,

i found this today within the shingle at Walton on the Naze in Essex, UK.  The usual teeth found here are striatolamia and Otodus but in humble opinion this doesn’t appear like any of those. Dare I say more like carcharocles (is that spelled right?) I’m trying to not get too excited but any help would be appreciated. 

A94C6C05-B4FE-4F3B-9889-EF4B789C3E1E.jpeg

32EAF4FD-3232-48F7-B1CD-BF0595500163.jpeg

B452FEC1-9B66-49BF-8F5C-A91F1EECA9E2.jpeg

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t-tree

Nice find ......i would be getting excited waiting for an id if i had found it !

 

John

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MRfossilMISTER

not sure either, but definetly a great tooth to get excited about!

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WhodamanHD

Beautiful fossil! Love the lightning strikes. I’m not familiar with the area, but it’s ypresian (Eocene) and Late Pliocene-Pleistocene according to the internet. It could be a meg (Carcharocles megalodon or Otodus negalodon) or it could be a great white ( Carcharodon carcharias) but it’s hard to tell which without the root preserved.

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FunkyMonkey

Thanks for the feedback so far. Any of those suggestions would be fantastic. Its a pity that it can’t be pinned down further but thanks for your help. I’m chuffed!

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ynot

My vote is for a worn meg.

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WhodamanHD
12 minutes ago, FunkyMonkey said:

Thanks for the feedback so far. Any of those suggestions would be fantastic. Its a pity that it can’t be pinned down further but thanks for your help. I’m chuffed!

No problem! I would lean meg as well, but I can’t be sure. Perhaps a local will chime in and can say whether GWs are ever found there.

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ynot

The coarseness of the serrations and the v shape to the lingual side lead Me away from white shark.

 

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FunkyMonkey

Thank you so much for all your help. Really appreciated.. Megs are found at this location but are generally quite worn. If this were a Meg would it be from a juvenile given the size of the tooth?

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thelivingdead531

I’m going to lean towards a worn meg tooth as well. Very nice find!

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FunkyMonkey

Thank you everyone. This has made our weekend.

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