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The Amateur Paleontologist

Hey everyone, I'm back from my second Møns Klint Fossil Excavation - it was absolutely fantastic! :D 

For the majority of 2 weeks, I was down at the chalk cliffs of Møn; and recovered quite a sizable quantity of (mostly echinoderm) good-quality fossil material. All of it is still safely stowed away in ice cream boxes and kitchen paper "field jackets", but I can not wait to getting down to preparing all those fossils.

Unfortunately, I did not manage to rediscover the "Echinoderm Quarry", but I did on the other hand have the chance to work on some new, very fossiliferous sites.

Along with extensive fieldwork, I also got the privilege of analysing the MK Thoracosaurine jaw fossil, and meeting the Director and the Fossil Guide of the GeoCenter Møns Klint.

I'll give detailed and illustrated accounts of all that happened* during this successful field session in the next few days... Stay tuned :)

 

*Except, of course, for my studies of the MK Thoracosaurine - that'll have to wait until after the paper has been published (IF it does end up being published)

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Rather busy right now, I'll conduct a major unpacking of all my MK fossils during the weekend. I'll post pictures of course ;)

 

In the meantime, here's a few photos from various moments of the MKFE Nº2 - hope you enjoy!

 

A bit of scenery..

5b59c67b7980f_ScreenShot2018-07-26at15_01_44.png.a65b34ab053cff54bdfcae86e9463af8.png

 

Nodule of chalk that preserves a cidarid spine assemblage - collected 9th July; still in preparation.

5b59c6fc48a59_ScreenShot2018-07-26at15_03_09.png.ed3961aead7b41afd4c5ae7541863e5a.png

 

My typical workspace

5b59c7cc66b36_ScreenShot2018-07-26at15_07_46.png.b664b3ddd5dca167847b291c1af8d1c1.png

 

In-situ articulated Isselicrinus 'stem' - turned out to consist of a little under 40 columnals (rather rare..). Collected tuesday 17th, still in preparation.

5b59c84c7034b_ScreenShot2018-07-26at15_10_13.png.bf829d1768289a0e8fee413e546551a7.png

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Tidgy's Dad

Very nice! 

Look forward to seeing more! :)

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@Tidgy's Dad Thanks for the kind words :) You -and everyone else on TFF- are definitely gonna see more fossils this weekend - but be warned.. many of them are still in their as-found & unprepped condition

 

 

For any of those who want to see, I even wrote a short bit of free-verse poetry that sums up the entire field session. hope it's not too bad..

 

White chalk

Grey-ish glint

  -an echinoderm fragment

Scorched by the sun

Bitten by the wind

Fingers numbed by superglue...

Worth it.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

I've unpacked a good part of the fossils from my Møns Klint field trip; and will post pictures of the better specimens tomorrow.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

?Echinodermata indet.

Not sure what this is... first thought it was a crinoid stem, but then I noticed that it was tapering. And it has this little projection at the top... Specimen measures approx. 20-30mm long

So something "echinoderm-like", segmented, tapering, and with a small protuberance.. Any thoughts on what this could be?

20180730_230840.thumb.jpg.f4c1bc6ccb7dcacb8c49f30f6e80c1b1.jpg

 

Selection of microfossils from material that has washed out of the chalk cliffs. Includes fragments of regular echinoids, a partial serpulid, inoceramid shell fragments, a coral...

20180730_230559.thumb.jpg.9f31056b13300bdfa7cfbeb807c51752.jpg

 

Well preserved rostrum of a juvenile ?Belemnella belemnite. The small patch of white encrusting near the tip is some kind of epifaunal bryozoan.

5b606d035b044_ScreenShot2018-07-31at16_06_38.png.7b1ed5516831b9b39c77b40d9afd240b.png

 

More to follow...

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Nodule of chalk that shows signs of at least 3 spines of an indet. cidarid echinoid.. Some of the rock came loose and revealed the presence of another spine fragment. There's a rather high likelyhood that there's more material inside the block of chalk :)

5b606dbf3f237_ScreenShot2018-07-31at16_09_26.png.d656477c873b9d89728f088f3c966ec3.png

 

Well-preserved and almost complete spine of a Stereocidaris pistillum; the piece of chalk also includes a possible fragmentary cirrepede (circled in black).

5b606ea7dd4b2_ScreenShot2018-07-31at16_11_01.png.2157c5efc131556153fc6be5095614ad.png

 

A few days ago I posted a picture (in this same thread) of an in-situ Isselicrinus crinoid stem. Here's the whole (unprepped as of today) thing ;)

5b606f4374bb5_ScreenShot2018-07-31at16_16_12.png.bb2f011f049e840cd4c2644d659b7aed.png

 

 

I haven't unpacked all of the fossils yet, so expect more to be posted in the next few days ;) In the meantime, hope y'all enjoyed this!

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David in Japan

thank you so much for the pictures and your report. Really interesting!

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