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Rockwood

Tadpole trace ?

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Rockwood
17 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

I believe you are correct, Dale. Tadpole "nests".

See this article

These tadpoles live in a spring fed pool in a gravel pit at the foot of a mountain. It rarely dries up and the nests were at the shallow edge. 

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Innocentx

This is really cool, @Rockwood! I'm very interested in this kind of trace fossil at the moment.

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abyssunder

I wonder why they remind me of graphoglyptids, especially Paleodictyon ?

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Rockwood
47 minutes ago, abyssunder said:

I wonder why they reminds me of graphoglyptids, especially Paleodictyon ?

The thought had occurred to me. The fact that they are in shallow water seems to support the connection in a weird kind of way.

Frogs have farms ?

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Rockwood
4 minutes ago, supertramp said:

they someway resemble interference ripples

We have had heavy rain lately and such an event could create temporary currents that cross the main flow of the spring.

Any ideas how it could be confirmed or ruled out ?

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westcoast

Intetesting discovery. That's a really cool observation. I can see that as a published neoichnology article...If it hasn't been noted before. .

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abyssunder
54 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

The thought had occurred to me. The fact that they are in shallow water seems to support the connection in a weird kind of way.

Paleodictyon usually was / is in the abyssal realm, but documents said it was discovered also in shallow water facies, and plus for this, in freshwater environments (see Pickerill, 1990 ).

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GeschWhat

Very interesting - and great photos! :)

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supertramp
19 hours ago, Rockwood said:

We have had heavy rain lately and such an event could create temporary currents that cross the main flow of the spring.

Any ideas how it could be confirmed or ruled out ?

I don't believe those are interference ripples, but they do look like that;

in other words: could some fossil interference ripples actually be tadpole traces? 

 

ciao

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Rockwood
3 hours ago, supertramp said:

could some fossil interference ripples actually be tadpole traces? 

I suspect the behavior may be the exception rather than the rule which would lessen the odds, but it may be worth considering.

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Plantguy

Those are fantastic...tadpole traces...very interesting...learned something again. 

 

What kind of scale/approx size are we talking about...they look much larger than the Paleodictyon I ran into years ago...which were smallish in the order of a cm or so...

 

Regards, Chris 

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Rockwood
5 hours ago, Plantguy said:

Those are fantastic...tadpole traces...very interesting...learned something again. 

 

What kind of scale/approx size are we talking about...they look much larger than the Paleodictyon I ran into years ago...which were smallish in the order of a cm or so...

 

Regards, Chris 

If one were to recreate them a golf ball would be the appropriate tool. Something around 3cm in diameter probably. The  legs on the tadpoles were quite well developed.

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Plax

can you feel into one of the pits to see if a freshwater clam is in there? Tadpoles living commensally with clams would really be interesting! Have seen aggregations of tads before but they are usually in a mass. The spacing is very regular on the pits.

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Innocentx

@abyssunder. Scientific American article with photos was most interesting.

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Rockwood
15 hours ago, Plax said:

can you feel into one of the pits to see if a freshwater clam is in there? Tadpoles living commensally with clams would really be interesting! Have seen aggregations of tads before but they are usually in a mass. The spacing is very regular on the pits.

I will try, but it seems doubtful. This is still an active pit that is some distance from other bodies of water. I doubt this level has been exposed long enough to establish a population even if it had been seeded somehow.

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Plax

I think that Abyssunder's Scientific American article proves they are tadpole nests. And to think that I fancy myself an amateur herpetologist!

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Rockwood

One week later after more heavy rains. 

The algae would perhaps be instrumental in preserving these features. If they were in an overall depositional environment. These will never make it.

IMG_4857a.jpg

IMG_4855a.jpg

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Scylla
38 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

One week later after more heavy rains. 

The algae would perhaps be instrumental in preserving these features. If they were in an overall depositional environment. These will never make it.

IMG_4857a.jpg

IMG_4855a.jpg

Very interesting! Is neoichnology really a field? When taking a photo like the two above, a polarized filter helps eliminate the reflection of the sky. If using your cell phone, just snap the photo through your sunglasses 

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Rockwood
22 minutes ago, Scylla said:

Is neoichnology really a field?

Most definitely. A basic understanding of such concepts is key to understanding the fossil record. 

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Innocentx
13 hours ago, Rockwood said:

These will never make it.

To have these preserved would take a particular set of circumstances. I think there would have to be many years of drought following the original forming of the traces for them to become trace fossils. I imagine the sun would contribute to hardening/baking of the depressions, as with clay. Then some years later when rains began again, the hardened depressions would fill with silt and debris and the formation of more layers, etc. Fun to think about.

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Rockwood
7 hours ago, Innocentx said:

To have these preserved would take a particular set of circumstances. I think there would have to be many years of drought following the original forming of the traces for them to become trace fossils. I imagine the sun would contribute to hardening/baking of the depressions, as with clay. Then some years later when rains began again, the hardened depressions would fill with silt and debris and the formation of more layers, etc. Fun to think about.

Many times all it takes is a layer of material that acts as a divider between the bedding layers.

These sediments will almost certainly eventually make their way to the Atlantic before they get their chance though. The area has been an erosional environment since the Appalachains got their start during the Devonian. 

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