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Kane

A Hammering Primer

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Tidgy's Dad

My hammer is my friend. 

I love my hammer. 

Give your hammer a name. 

Mine is Harry (after my dad) 

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Raggedy Man

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Though I prefer the following method...

4476079-2963296648-40223.jpg.ac71356b100dadd6c0c2d80bcf396d33.jpg

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Bone guy
18 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Mine is Harry (after my dad) 

So Harry is Tiddy's dad's dad and Tidgy's great grand dad. :P 

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Bobby Rico

 Very useful post indeed . Some top tips. That reminds me I do need a new hammer I just bought my freind one for his birthday. 

 

Kane I think this could be a good post  to be pinned.

 

Cheers Bobby

 

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Raggedy Man
20 minutes ago, Bobby Rico said:

 Very useful post indeed . Some top tips. That reminds me I do need a new hammer I just bought my freind one for his birthday. 

 

Kane I think this could be a good post  to be pinned.

 

Cheers Bobby

 

I agree. In all seriousness, these are great tips to ensure you're able to stay healthy for years huntin fossils without injury caused by repetitive hammer swings. Last fall I smashed my leg with a 4 lb sledge blow that glanced off a piece of rock I was splitting. I had a golf ball sized welt on my tibia for months. I now use shin guards...lol

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WhodamanHD

One underestimated how important hammering is in respects to fossil hunting, an offense I am guilty of.

I used a screw driver instead of a chisel for longer than I care to admit. Don’t do it. And get a geologic hammer, it is amazing just how much a difference it makes. 

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Kane
On 8/4/2018 at 6:11 PM, WhodamanHD said:

One underestimated how important hammering is in respects to fossil hunting, an offense I am guilty of.

I used a screw driver instead of a chisel for longer than I care to admit. Don’t do it. And get a geologic hammer, it is amazing just how much a difference it makes. 

I started with a claw hammer and a wood chisel. :DOH: The fact that I didn't get injured was the only silver lining; my ability to bust rock effectively with those kinds of tools was horrible, and thus the finds were very limited. 

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Innocentx

You are a wealth of information, @Kane, and much appreciated for sharing it!

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Fossildude19

Topic has been Pinned! 

Excellent information for not only those who have no prior experience with using a hammer to bust up rocks, but even those who have long thought they knew enough about hammering. :)

Well done, sir. 

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Raggedy Man
On 8/4/2018 at 6:33 PM, Innocentx said:

You are a wealth of information, @Kane, and much appreciated for sharing it!

Absolutely 100% agree with you. I always look forward to Kanes posts and the seeing his finds especially since where he hunts coincides with the ordovician I hunt.

I do get :envy:  sometimes because the matrix he works with is much easier to deal with than with the matrix (dolomitic limestone) I work with.

The trilobites seems to preserve better than the preservation bias we deal with down here. I wish I knew this information or bother to look it up when I started getting into this addiction. I actually developed ulnar neuropathy and had to stop "laying the hammer down" for a while to allow the nerves to heal. Through trial and error I've learned to let the hammer do the work and not to force the split. Hopefully the next time im at Penn Dixie Kane is able to come down for some fun. I've heard some amazing stores from Devonian Digger about Kane and would love to see the "human backhoe" at work ...and maybe even learn something new I can utilize in my neck of the woods. Thanks again Kane for posting this!

 

Best regards,

Paul

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Walt
On 8/4/2018 at 8:22 PM, Raggedy Man said:

Absolutely 100% agree with you. I always look forward to Kanes posts and the seeing his finds especially since where he hunts coincides with the ordovician I hunt. I do get :envy:sometimes because the matrix he works with is much easier to deal with than with the matrix (dolomitic limestone) I work with. The trilobites seems to preserve better than the preservation bias we deal with down here. I wish I knew this information or bother to look it up when I started getting into this addiction. I actually developed ulnar neuropathy and had to stop "laying the hammer down" for a while to allow the nerves to heal. Through trial and error I've learned to let the hammer do the work and not to force the split. Hopefully the next time im at Penn Dixie Kane is able to come down for some fun. I've heard some amazing stores from Devonian Digger about Kane and would love to see the "human backhoe" at work ...and maybe even learn something new I can utilize in my neck of the woods. Thanks again Kane for posting this!

 

Best regards,

Paul

After messaging with @Kane a few times, reading his posts, and looking at his website I have reached the conclusion Kane is not human and is, in fact, a cyborg endowed with the knowledge of the universe.  How else can one man do so much in one day or know so much.  Seriously though....yeah, robot.:default_rofl:

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Kane
45 minutes ago, Raggedy Man said:

Thanks again Kane for posting this!

 

Any time, Paul! :) I'm hoping we'll get a chance to break some rock together at PD, maybe this autumn! 

 

And thanks, all. :dinothumb: If there's one thing I love to do, it's hammering! :D 

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RJB

  I never would have thought that one could write more than a sentence or two about a hammer but this is purty good stuff.  Good on ya Kane.  As for #3 Guarding against injury,  I myself have used all kinds and sizes of hammer including sledge hammers.   Im my early days and with some very large concretions I would wear shorts in the summertime.  One day whilst swinging one of my sledges, the rock exploded and a small but very sharply pointed piece going at bullet speed went into my shin.  I had to wiggle it to get it out of my shin bone.  I always wore pants after that. 

 

RB

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LiamL

When up on the Yorkshire coast hammering is almost unavoidable! Great post

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Reese the Rockhound

I personally prefer Estwings.

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Reese the Rockhound

I can attest to wooden-handled sledge hammers being a poor choice.  My father was using one at Penn Dixie a few months ago, and suffice it to say that it was the only tool we didn't bring back in good condition.

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Mark Kmiecik

I would like to add one precaution to this thread. Avoid using any hammer that has a flat steel shaft like this for any kind of hammering on anything. One mis-strike and you will chop off that thumb or finger just as surely as if you hit it with an axe.

 

 

Claw-hammer.jpg

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Kane
10 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

Avoid using any hammer that has a flat steel shaft like this for any kind of hammering on anything. One mis-strike and you will chop off that thumb or finger just as surely as if you hit it with an axe.

This makes too blanket a statement. Most Estwing rock picks have a shaft as you describe, and is the preferred tool of choice among many fossil collectors. I can say from experience with several fossil collectors who have used Estwings for decades that they still have all their fingers and thumbs intact. I would think most of us would not put our hands in the vicinity of where the hammer will strike, and barring exigent circumstances such as sudden blindness or disorientation, safe and proper use of any tool will mitigate against injury.

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Fossildude19
10 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

I would like to add one precaution to this thread. Avoid using any hammer that has a flat steel shaft like this for any kind of hammering on anything. One mis-strike and you will chop off that thumb or finger just as surely as if you hit it with an axe.

 

I've used Estwing rock hammers almost exclusively, for the past 24 years. (My sledge is wooden handled.)

The only injuries I've sustained from using them are when I am holding a piece to try to split, and usually, not at full force. 

Bruised thumbs and egos only. 

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Auspex
10 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

I would like to add one precaution to this thread. Avoid using any hammer that has a flat steel shaft like this for any kind of hammering on anything. One mis-strike and you will chop off that thumb or finger just as surely as if you hit it with an axe.

 

 

Claw-hammer.jpg

A cheap claw hammer? Leave it on the woodworking bench, and get an Estwing.
I'd worry more about metal shards than guillotined digits!

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Randyw

Maybe I’m just lucky but in 50+ years of hammering I’ve never hit my fingers with a handle of a hammer.. the head yes but never the handle. And I know a number of current and old school construction workers and carpenters who swear by those handles over other kinds. But a word of caution using tools is never misplaced.

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