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The Amateur Paleontologist

Found this rather interesting diagram in the Currie & Longrich (2009) paper describing Hesperonychus. The diagram shows outlines of several carnivorous theropods from the Dinosaur Provincial Park assemblage, to illustrate the size & morphological range. I thought some people might like to see this :) 

 

@Troodon @Canadawest @Paleoworld-101

image.jpg

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Whatever size you are. 

Wherever you hide.

There's something out there that can get you! :o

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Assuming ricardoestesia isn’t a pterosaur

EDIT: R. gilmorei is valid though

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The Amateur Paleontologist
1 hour ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Whatever size you are. 

Wherever you hide.

There's something out there that can get you! :o

Absolutely right - If it's got chompers and claws, size doesn't matter... Cats, for instance. They can have completely devastating effects on human physiology ;).

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Thanks for posting, nice representation.  Nice reference material 

 

Put this out on the Hell Creek

 

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Paleoworld-101

Cool image :) 

 

Interesting how there's no middle-ground in terms of size, there's only small and large. 

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@Troodon thanks for the link to the HC Fm. picture, it's rather informative :) I found this similar one some time ago:

 

 

hell_creek_formation_fauna_by_paleoguy-d8w81vt.jpg

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The Amateur Paleontologist
6 hours ago, Paleoworld-101 said:

Cool image :) 

 

Interesting how there's no middle-ground in terms of size, there's only small and large. 

I'm sure a large-bodied dromaeosaur (i.e. Dakotaraptor) will one day be found in DPP :) Then there'll be a middle ground

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The Caenagnathid and Ornithomimid theropod dinosaurs are not reflected in that chart since they are not "carnivorous" types but would fit that middle ground.  Latenivenatrix mcmasterae was described in 2017 after that paper was written and its a very large Troodontid about 3.5 m long, one of the largest.  Im sure new discoveries will keep changing that view.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Well then. Time to Photoshop Latenivenatrix into the diagram - and also Albertavenator curriei.

Oh, and on second thought, it'd be useful to add a giant question mark over the Richardoestesia... ;)

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15 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

also Albertavenator curriei.

Not from Dinosaur Park but is earlier in age from Horseshoe Canyon Fm. 

 

Richardoestesia is very valid, they are describing R.gilmorei not R. isosceles 

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36 minutes ago, Troodon said:

Richardoestesia is very valid, they are describing R.gilmorei not R. isosceles 

My fault, forgot. Although I still find it strange that they could estimate size based on jaw fragments with any certainty. 

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@Troodon So there's no confusion with regard to the pterosaur/theropod identity of Richardoestesia? It's definitely a theropod?

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Only R. isosceles not R. gilmorei  they are two very different animals

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3 hours ago, WhodamanHD said:

My fault, forgot. Although I still find it strange that they could estimate size based on jaw fragments with any certainty. 

They are pretty proficient based on looking at skulls from similar dinosaurs. 

Here is my jaw from a R. gilmorei just missing the back end with 3 unerupted teeth

RaptorJaw1f.thumb.jpg.c56db13376b00646385bd6f819c09f0b.jpg5b72fe9e34829_raptorjaw1ff(2).jpg.349ca9f3b0825ecad034e65fda1a56b8.jpg

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1 minute ago, Troodon said:

 

Here is my jaw from a R. gilmorei just missing the back end with 3 unerupted teeth

 

Wow that is a incredible jaw especially from the Hell Creek.  Thanks for posting nice to see one.

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The Amateur Paleontologist
5 hours ago, Troodon said:

They are pretty proficient based on looking at skulls from similar dinosaurs. 

Here is my jaw from a R. gilmorei just missing the back end with 3 unerupted teeth

That's a wonderful jaw! Did you find it?

 

 

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1 hour ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

That's a wonderful jaw! Did you find it?

 

Unfortunately no

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