Jump to content
historianmichael

Pennsylvanian Plants near Centralia, PA

Recommended Posts

historianmichael

And what is maybe a branch of Calamites

IMG_4971.thumb.jpg.336ed4f03bffc989630d8f01a8bd8885.jpg

 

We also found these unknown leaves. If anyone knows what they might be, please help.

 

IMG_4969.thumb.jpg.bcbb43d0e2bcb65fae7140351453272c.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

You and pops got some really nice pieces. Congrates on your honeyhole location. :dinothumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard

Some very beautifull plant fossils! Congratulations and thanks for sharing!

Did you discover this site yourself? What type is the site (coal mine dump, river bank, construction site... ?)

Thanks!
Franz Bernhard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

Lovely finds and lots of them! 

What a great location you have found. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
historianmichael
6 hours ago, FranzBernhard said:

Some very beautifull plant fossils! Congratulations and thanks for sharing!

Did you discover this site yourself? What type is the site (coal mine dump, river bank, construction site... ?)

Thanks!
Franz Bernhard

 

Thank you! These were two sites shown to us by the NYPS. They are kinda hole-in-the-wall coal mine dumps. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
1 hour ago, historianmichael said:

These were two sites shown to us by the NYPS. They are kinda hole-in-the-wall coal mine dumps.

Thanks for the infos!
Franz Bernhard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fifbrindacier

Wow !:envy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
deutscheben

Those are some excellent plants- it's wonderful how clear many of them are. It's also quite nice that so many are distinct  single plants- so often Pennsylvanian compression plant fossils like this are a mish-mash. 

 

The broad "leaves" are actually separated bracts from a cone- they are called Lepidostrobophyllum, while the complete cone is Lepidostrobus. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Monica

Stunning specimens!!!  I especially like the Sphenophyllum - it's simply beautiful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plantguy

Great collection of material! I especially like the cone bract examples that deutcheben pointed out.  Very nice. Thanks for showing us. Regards, Chris 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
paleoflor

Beautiful plant fossils! Never seen any from Centralia before. The second of your two types of Calamites is most probably C. suckowii. The others are difficult to see on my phone...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
paleoflor

Your "unkown leafs" are lepidostrobophylla.

 

EDIT: Oops, just noticed deutscheben already provided this ID. Blaming small screen here... 

Edited by paleoflor
Stupidity and not reading all previous replies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rachelgardner01

I have new plans for the weekend because of this post. WOW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark Kmiecik
On 8/18/2018 at 11:28 PM, historianmichael said:

IMG_4969.thumb.jpg.bcbb43d0e2bcb65fae7140351453272c.jpg

Possibly Lepidostrobophyllum lanceolatum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RandyB

Great finds @historianmichael, especially so in that they are from a local site to me :D. Centralia is about a half hour from here.  I was just talking to a coworker about checking out that area earlier this week.  Now I guess I have some incentive to go exploring. 

 

I love the annularia. Congratulations on a great day 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×