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Ryann10006

Found this that I believe is a cephalopod today at a devonian spot with imported material, I haven't seen a cephalopod with a bulbed tip before so I am not sure if it's some sort of pathology of a species or it's own species.

IMG_20180823_154000421_LL.jpg

IMG_20180823_154004243_LL (1).jpg

IMG_20180823_154035337_BURST000_COVER_TOP.jpg

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jpc

What do you mean by 'imported material'?  

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Kane

Not sure given the pictures, but it could just be fractured where it is more exposed. That being said, there are nautiloids that terminate in a rounded shape.

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Rockwood

Without preserved septa to give a sense of orientation I suspect it may just appear to be a bulb. A bit more careful preparation may help.

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Ryann10006
33 minutes ago, jpc said:

What do you mean by 'imported material'?  

I mean its's not native to the area, it came from rocks brought from a quarry in upstate new york

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Ryann10006
17 minutes ago, Auspex said:

I don't think the obvious "bulb" is the terminus; there seem to be ghostly indication od at least a couple more:

~~.jpg

It is also not clear to me that it is a cephalopod; I have seen burrows with similar morphology.

Yeah theres little marks that shows at least two more segments from the top, makes it have an oval shape to the tip, thank you for pointing that out didn't see those at first.

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BobWill

There were several bulb-tipped Bactrites. Is there any reason to exclude them?

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Rob Russell

Could it be a siphuncle from a very large cephalopod.  

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Ryann10006
4 minutes ago, BobWill said:

There were several bulb-tipped Bactrites. Is there any reason to exclude them?

Would you happen to know of any that can be found in New York? Or any species names it would make a good reference point.

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Auspex
2 minutes ago, Rob Russell said:

Could it be a siphuncle from a very large cephalopod.  

Good thought.

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Ryann10006
1 minute ago, Rob Russell said:

Could it be a siphuncle from a very large cephalopod.  

Yeah the rest of it is broken off so it's hard for me to guess the full length so that could be a possibility 

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BobWill
1 hour ago, Ryann10006 said:

Would you happen to know of any that can be found in New York? Or any species names it would make a good reference point.

Sorry, all the bulb-tipped ones I know of are Carboniferous and shown in a Mapes, 1979 paper. I don't have anything on any Devonian Bactrites. My comment was mostly meant as a suggestion for someone with more information.

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KimTexan

I know nothing about Devonian cephalopods, but from the cepholopods I do know I’ve never seen one like that. I’ve seen some with a bulb on the end, but nothing like that.

It definitely isn’t a fossilized tomato caterpillar, but it kind of looks like a big fat one.

I think sponge is a very likely option. 

 

5 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

I haven’t see you around in awhile Ben. Good to see you on here. :D

 

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doushantuo

Yeah, still on the fence. :ninja:

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Fossildude19
6 hours ago, Ryann10006 said:

@Fossildude19 @doushantuo Here are some close up of the texture if they helps, upon closer look it actually does look a bit spongy.

Unfortunately, I am not knowledgeable about sponges.  :( 

The description in my field guide says this:

 

0824180647_Film1.jpg

 

It looks to me like a decent match to your item.

Maybe @Spongy Joe or @TqB  or @FossilDAWG will have something to add. 

 

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TqB

I'm also on the fence here, slightly leaning towards sponge. The dark break at the top seems to show hints of a network, similar to that on the surface, which might support sponge.

 

But there's also a shell-like white layer visible around the edge of it... Looks very irregular for cephalopod, unless it's a very distorted siphuncle. :headscratch:

 

5b7fea5661a3f_ScreenShot2018-08-24at12_11_40.jpg.449c594727a627f7dc6331796c332c46.jpg

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doushantuo

Apart from stratigraphical considerations, more or less equidimensional globular "chambers" make me think of e.g. Amblysiphonella.

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Fossildude19
9 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

Apart from stratigraphical considerations, more or less equidimensional globular "chambers" make me think of e.g. Amblysiphonella.

 

According to Fossilworks, it isn't known from the Devonian of New York.  

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doushantuo

"apart from stratigraphical considerations"

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Fossildude19

It does look similar, but taking into consideration the stratigraphical differences, (because we kinda have to) I think is just confuses the issue to mention it if it doesn't appear to be a possibility. :unsure: 

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doushantuo

Sphinctozoan sponges are known from the Cambrian onwards.

edit :I take this remark back,with apologies to all concerned.

Why"? I am reading a Reitner(1985) piece on the phylogeny of the "Sphinctozoa",and in it there's little that seems to support my remark

 

 

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