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Jaimin013

Any dinosaurs out of Quebec

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Jaimin013

Hi All,

 

I am travelling to Quebec in September and was wondering if there are any dinosaur fossils out of this location?

 

A source I have read has said that No dinosaurs have been discovered here but wondering if anyone else has any input?

 

Thanks 

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Runner64

Heard the same thing as well. Sure there’s plenty of other super neat fossils to look for though :D

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Kane

Sorry, but I don't think so. :( There are some Paleozoic deposits, but 90% of Quebec's bedrock is Canadian Shield (Precambrian). 

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Jaimin013
47 minutes ago, Runner64 said:

Heard he same thing as well. Sure there’s plenty of other super neat fossils to look for though :D

Most certainly! 

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Jaimin013
47 minutes ago, Kane said:

Sorry, but I don't think so. :( There are some Paleozoic deposits, but 90% of Quebec's bedrock is Canadian Shield (Precambrian). 

Ok thanks!

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FossilDAWG

As the others have said, the bedrock in Quebec is all lower Paleozoic or older (mostly much older) so no dinosaurs.  The only exception is a thin cover of very late Pleistocene in a few places that has yielded some marine fossils, so again no dinosaurs.  That being said, some of the Paleozoic is quite fossiliferous, and there is an excellent museum at Miguasha that highlights the local Devonian fossils including many fish species and some that are transitional towards amphibians.  Quebec is a very large province, larger than all of Europe I believe.  Where will you be travelling?  I assume around Montreal or Quebec City?

 

Don

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Jaimin013
18 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

As the others have said, the bedrock in Quebec is all lower Paleozoic or older (mostly much older) so no dinosaurs.  The only exception is a thin cover of very late Pleistocene in a few places that has yielded some marine fossils, so again no dinosaurs.  That being said, some of the Paleozoic is quite fossiliferous, and there is an excellent museum at Miguasha that highlights the local Devonian fossils including many fish species and some that are transitional towards amphibians.  Quebec is a very large province, larger than all of Europe I believe.  Where will you be travelling?  I assume around Montreal or Quebec City?

 

Don

Yes that is correct, I am staying around Quebec City and Montreal

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Wrangellian
On 8/27/2018 at 7:31 PM, FossilDAWG said:

As the others have said, the bedrock in Quebec is all lower Paleozoic or older (mostly much older) so no dinosaurs.  The only exception is a thin cover of very late Pleistocene in a few places that has yielded some marine fossils, so again no dinosaurs.  That being said, some of the Paleozoic is quite fossiliferous, and there is an excellent museum at Miguasha that highlights the local Devonian fossils including many fish species and some that are transitional towards amphibians.  Quebec is a very large province, larger than all of Europe I believe.  Where will you be travelling?  I assume around Montreal or Quebec City?

 

Don

Quebec is not larger than all of Europe, even if you exclude European Russia!

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FossilDAWG

I was mistaken.  I was thinking of a map from school from when I was a kid, that likely involved Western Europe only but I'm not sure as that was about 10,000 years ago.  I did not know that Russia (or any part of it) was now considered to be part of Europe.  Anyway I think the whole concept of Europe as a "continent" is bogus, what clearly separates "Europe" from Asia in a geographical sense?

 

Don

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Wrangellian

Probably you were looking at a Mercator map which makes things look progressively larger toward the poles?

Yes, Eurasia is one big landmass.. Usually the Urals, the Caspian, the Caucasus and the Black and Aegean Seas are considered to be the border of Europe and Asia, for the sake of referring to them as separate areas. This makes 1/3 or Russia European, 2/3 Asian. Politically is another question...

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