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Chris Barth

ID 13" bone found in Calvert cliff (Huntingtown)

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Chris Barth

Yesterday I followed the stream that starts in my backyard to the bay.  Went north a bit and saw what looked like a piece of lignite in a small slab of cliff about to fall, tapped it with my machete(needed for clearing brush, spider webs,  maybe a copperhead Lol!)  and it made an unexpected clink instead of the mush that lignite usually is. My extraction method would probably make you guys puke but yes, I used my machete to slice until free.   It was high tide, waves splashing against me and cliff, also had two impatient boys and two dogs in tow so it was quick and dirty.  

 

Anyway, it ended up being a pretty large bone. Probably whale/dolphin rib, maybe flipper?? IDK...  Looks like some sort of joint at one end.   Kinda wonder if a whole skeleton is buried in the cliff????  20180829_162908.jpg.b879c9b3cde2a4b25c9675e184a1db25.jpg

20180829_162953.jpg

20180829_163005.jpg

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ynot

Rib bone is as far as I can take it.

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Chris Barth

Man, you're fast!  Makes you wonder how big it was.. 

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Jeffrey P

Maybe a dolphin rib. I wonder if there is more of it lying there.

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WhodamanHD

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Chris Barth
Just now, Jeffrey P said:

Maybe a dolphin rib. I wonder if there is more of it lying there.

Me too!  I just don't know the legality of digging into the cliffs.  Plus, I'm definitely no Louis Leaky when it comes to digging out bones!

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WhodamanHD
17 minutes ago, Chris Barth said:

Me too!  I just don't know the legality of digging into the cliffs.  Plus, I'm definitely no Louis Leaky when it comes to digging out bones!

Don’t, could fall on you. Fossils are cool as long as you don’t end up as one. If you see more, you can alert the CMM and they will dig it out and list you as the discoverer.

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WhodamanHD
Just now, FossilDAWG said:

Everyone knows it is illegal to dig into the cliffs.  

 

Don

Unless you have permission from landowner or are the landowner. Still shouldn’t do it unless you are a professional.

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Fossildude19
54 minutes ago, Chris Barth said:

Me too!  I just don't know the legality of digging into the cliffs.  Plus, I'm definitely no Louis Leaky when it comes to digging out bones!

 

27 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

Everyone knows it is illegal to dig into the cliffs.  

 

Don

 

I'm a bit surprised that an area resident doesn't know that it is not only illegal,  but dangerous as heck, too. :unsure: :headscratch:

As Don said, pretty much everyone knows this. 

 

The rangers have been making a point of arresting people they find doing it. And if your methods of  extraction "would probably make you guys puke ..." , then you should be leaving something like this to be dug out by professionals, who have the necessary permits/know how to dig in the cliff to rescue this type of fossil. 


Have heard plenty of stories of people destroying fossils by not properly removing them from the cliffs.  :( 

And if there is a whole one there,  it should be dug out by a museum, as it could be of scientific importance. ;)  

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caldigger
1 hour ago, Chris Barth said:

I'm definitely no Louis Leaky when it comes to digging out bones!

At least those are whole and not a bunch of chunks and crumbs needing to be glued together like the Leaky's had to work with.

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Chris Barth
1 hour ago, Fossildude19 said:

 

 

I'm a bit surprised that an area resident doesn't know that it is not only illegal,  but dangerous as heck, too. :unsure: :headscratch:

As Don said, pretty much everyone knows this. 

 

The rangers have been making a point of arresting people they find doing it. And if your methods of  extraction "would probably make you guys puke ..." , then you should be leaving something like this to be dug out by professionals, who have the necessary permits/know how to dig in the cliff to rescue this type of fossil. 


Have heard plenty of stories of people destroying fossils by not properly removing them from the cliffs.  :( 

And if there is a whole one there,  it should be dug out by a museum, as it could be of scientific importance. ;)  

I know all about the danger of cliff falls, still remember a lady being buried alive in the 70's north of Matoaka, I don't remember any in Calvert since then but I could be wrong.


I know you never know who you're dealing with here but I do have a bit of common sense with things like this.   This was in a section of lower cliff that was about to "slab off", the cliff face above it already fell, this was the last piece of that slab about to come off, if the remaining bit fell it wouldn't have caused harm.  If I didn't get to it at that moment the waves would have shortly after. 

I'm good friends with the landowners that own the property above this particular section of cliff. 

I realize it could be important, I will contact CMM soon and give them the location and if interested I will even set up a meeting with the landowner.

I'm just hazy on the particulars concerning the removal of fossils from cliffs.  I know there are laws but I looked at this as a grey area since it was about to fall anyway.  

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Chris Barth
1 hour ago, caldigger said:

At least those are whole and not a bunch of chunks and crumbs needing to be glued together like the Leaky's had to work with.

Actually, I did use a bit epoxy to glue a piece that broke.  Yes, I used a machete but I was careful as I could be not to damage the bone, If I had a finer tool I would have used it but time was of the essence as it was about to be reclaimed by the water.  No wild hacking at it, I used it to slice away clay above and below and behind.  Used water to flush out clay "tailings".  

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WhodamanHD
10 minutes ago, Chris Barth said:

Used water to flush out clay "tailings".  

This can lead to further breaks. As a veteran fossil hunter told me “never, NEVER, do prep in the field.” He said he once found a beautifully preserved meg with not a scratch on it, he rubbed some mud off and then can off half the bourlette.  Now, bones like this are less fragile and you had a while to to walk so it’s understandable, I would have done the same, but something to keep in mind. 

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Fossildude19
On 8/29/2018 at 8:53 PM, Chris Barth said:

I know all about the danger of cliff falls, still remember a lady being buried alive in the 70's north of Matoaka, I don't remember any in Calvert since then but I could be wrong.


I know you never know who you're dealing with here but I do have a bit of common sense with things like this.   This was in a section of lower cliff that was about to "slab off", the cliff face above it already fell, this was the last piece of that slab about to come off, if the remaining bit fell it wouldn't have caused harm.  If I didn't get to it at that moment the waves would have shortly after. 

I'm good friends with the landowners that own the property above this particular section of cliff. 

I realize it could be important, I will contact CMM soon and give them the location and if interested I will even set up a meeting with the landowner.

I'm just hazy on the particulars concerning the removal of fossils from cliffs.  I know there are laws but I looked at this as a grey area since it was about to fall anyway.  

 

 

I am glad to hear this.  Thanks for telling us.  :) 

This is the type of information that should be included in the opening post, to make everyone aware that you are there legally, and have land owner permission. ;) 

That way, you don't have people like me assuming the worst. :blush:

 

With the hundreds of people who view this Forum every day, we try to make sure that we emphasize Fossil Collecting Ethics. :mellow:

We would hate to be responsible for encouraging those out there who flaunt the laws, disrespect private property,  and do not follow the ethics of collecting, just to bring home a specimen that may be of scientific importance.  :(

 

Please let us know what comes from this wonderful find. :) 

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Chris Barth

Thanks

27 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

 

 

I am glad to hear this.  Thanks for telling us.  :) 

This is the type of information that should be included in the opening post, to make everyone aware that you are there legally, and have land owner permission. ;) 

That way, you don't have people like me assuming the worst. :blush:

 

With the hundreds of people who view this Forum every day, we try to make sure that we emphasize Fossil Collecting Ethics. :mellow:

We would hate to be responsible for encouraging those out there who flaunt the laws, disrespect private property,  and do not follow the ethics of collecting, just to bring home a specimen that may be

of scientific importance.  :(

 

Please let us know what comes from this wonderful find. :) 

Thanks! I agree my opening post should have included more info. 

In the freshly broken face of the cliff above where I found the bone, I saw what looks like several oval cross-sections of bones lying perpendicular to the cliff face.  Could be something or it could just be an illusion/wishful thinking. Hopefully, that's not a bad sign that a lot has broken off already.   I know I'm not digging for it!  Will keep you guys posted with any info.

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Shellseeker
6 hours ago, Chris Barth said:

Anyway, it ended up being a pretty large bone. Probably whale/dolphin rib, maybe flipper?? IDK...  Looks like some sort of joint at one end.   Kinda wonder if a whole skeleton is buried in the cliff????  

IMG_1340.jpg.fddffc307fc9b5712d2a3e9c469b51e8.jpg I do not think that yours are big enough for whale,, maybe dolphin...   I have found some ribs myself... They seem to have a similar connection joint as yours.IMG_1336Ribs.thumb.jpg.0d4c6664698d7f15af6dd090c59df09d.jpg

 

These are photos from a Florida museum of dugong ribs.  I think yours are most likely dolphin.IMG_2566.jpg.9818556a45785383a3a21ec1ffb34384.jpgIMG_2564.jpg.d590102dc831e4d9431c258d3bdb47f0.jpg

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Chris Barth

Wow, that almost a dead ringer with the the joint. I guess it connects to cartilage? Looks like it was buried in coquina(hard pan), difficult stuff to dig through!

 

There has to be more buried in there unless most of it already collapsed. Odds of just one bone would be low I'd think.  I walk by this section frequently and don't remember a recent fall but waves at high tide hit the cliff so it could have rapidly washed away any fall.  

 

Supposed to be a tropical storm coming for labor day, hopefully it won't cause more erosion, then again it might reveal more. I'll contact CMM today. 

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WhodamanHD
3 hours ago, Chris Barth said:

Wow, that almost a dead ringer with the the joint. I guess it connects to cartilage?

Connects to the vertebrae, though I would assume a bunch of cartilage is there as well.

 

hope the CMM can find any whale left! Chriscetus barthi:D

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Boesse

This is from a small to medium sized odontocete (dolphin) judging from the fact that the rib is only slightly wider than a AA battery. That's a bit too tiny for most Miocene baleen whales.

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Chris Barth
1 hour ago, Boesse said:

This is from a small to medium sized odontocete (dolphin) judging from the fact that the rib is only slightly wider than a AA battery. That's a bit too tiny for most Miocene baleen whales.

Thanks! Been finding lots of stuff lately, makes you think about whats buried below most of the east coast.  If you think about it, the amount of life the Earth has supported through the ages is mindboggling! Gotta chuckle at the 6000yr Earth believers, mental defect!   

 

 I emailed Dr. Stephen Godfrey at the Calvert Marine Museum just in case it peaked their interest.  Probably nothing significant but then again about 10yrs ago I seem to remember a guy found what turned out to be a whole skeleton of some rare/undiscovered whale or dolphin around the Brownies/Randalls cliffs area.  

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WhodamanHD
16 minutes ago, Chris Barth said:

Thanks! Been finding lots of stuff lately, makes you think about whats buried below most of the east coast.

A lot, Maryland has every time period represented with sedimentary rocks except the Jurassic. We got everything from trilobites to dinosaurs to Megalodon and a good bit in between.

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Max-fossils
2 hours ago, WhodamanHD said:

A lot, Maryland has every time period represented with sedimentary rocks except the Jurassic.

Also Eemian? :rolleyes: 

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WhodamanHD
12 minutes ago, Max-fossils said:

Also Eemian? :rolleyes: 

We do have some Permian on the top of mountains in western Maryland. I’ve heard of dimetrodon bones but never anything verifiable. Have seen plants from it.

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Max-fossils
Just now, WhodamanHD said:

We do have some Permian on the top of mountains in western Maryland. I’ve heard of dimetrodon bones but never anything verifiable. Have seen plants from it.

Lol I meant Eemian (like I had written), as in the interglacial period from the late Pleistocene (130'000 to 115'000 years ago). You know that I am much more at home with the younger critters :P 

I think you mixed it up with Emsian.

But I didn't really ask that question seriously. I think that the Eemian is mostly considered as a real age only here in Europe, and there are other terms for it in other places around the world (with slightly different dates I think). I only asked because it's my favorite moment in paleontology, mainly because the shells I find at the Zandmotor are from that substage. 

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