Jump to content

Help ID Fossils From Manitoulin Island


Jacob_Klempt

Recommended Posts

Hello, I just got back from my first fossil hunting trip and am hoping to get a little help to ID some of my finds. These were found on Manitoulin Island off HWY 6 & New England Rd, I`m sure a few people on here have already been there. I didn`t do any digging or picking but I managed to find a few specimens laying around worth bringing home.

 

Fossil #1 Approx 6cm by 6cm total, gonna take a wild guess that it`s some sort of shell

ddHDmGhl.jpg

Fossil #2 Approx 7cm by 11cm total, looks like corral to me, lots of little bits in the area like this but this was the nicest one I found

Tm2tMsml.jpg

 

oo3qPVsl.jpg

 

Fossil #3 Approx 5cm by 3cm total, no idea what this could be

1JpSgzwl.jpg

 

Fossil #4 Approx 12cm by 14cm total, again have no idea what these could be

MMZqpAkl.jpg

 

Fossil #5 Approx 7cm by 5cm total, possible the tip of a larger shell?

njHlYkUl.jpg

rdxTfzcl.jpg

 

Fossil? #6 Approx 12cm by 14cm total, not sure if this one is even a fossil or just mineral veins.

FYjqbG8l.jpg

 

I would be grateful for any help ID these finds, thanks in advance.

 

 

 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
MRfossilMISTER

1# could be some type of brachiopod. no clue what the others could be tho. but lets see what the admins think ;).

Link to post
Share on other sites
Macrophyseter

As far as I know, Manitoulin Island is Ordovician.

 

#1 could either be a bivalve or a brachipod.

 

#2 may be a piece of sponge

 

#3 might be a portion of coral

 

#5 is a horn coral

 

MrFossilMister is a ninja :ninja:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting finds. Manitoulin Island is a bit of a mixed bag, geologically, as there are bands of Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician that all seem to pinch in and across the island in a kind of arc (it's a little like taking much of southern Ontario's geology from Windsor to Toronto and compressing it to the scale of the island itself, but missing some visible formation outcrops). The fossil #2 is not a sponge, but a tabulate/colonial coral. It would be interesting to see more images of #4 if you get the chance. I am thinking #6 is a trace/burrow. 

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Manitoulin Island is an extention of the Niagra Escarpment and so, as Kane says, it is composed of Late Ordovician (mostly exposed on the northern side) and Silurian rocks (mostly the southern half).  I am not aware of any Devonian formations on the island.

Fossil #1 is likely a bivalve.  The style of ribs reminds me of something along the lines of Byssonychia which occurs in the Ordovician, but it's impossible to be sure without exposing more of the shell.  #2 is a tabulate coral, most likely Favosites.  Several species occur in the Silurian formations, identification to species requires measurement of corallite size and study if internal features such as spacing of tabular.  #3 reminds me of a chain coral (Halysites or Catenipora) or lass likely a Syringopora, better photos are needed to decide for sure.  #4 are pentamerid brachiopods. The prominent spondylium that seems to divide the shell in two is characteristic.  There are a few genera (mostly Pentamerus but also some relatives) and several species in the Ontarii Silurian. If IDed to species they can be used to divide the formations into narrower biozones. #5 is a solitary rugose coral (horn coral).  A more precise ID requires observation of internal structures, which would require cutting thin sections.  All the fossils except possibly #1 are typical Silurian finds.  #6 doesn't seem to be a body fossil to me.

 

Don

  • I found this Informative 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
JUAN EMMANUEL

Fossil #1 looks like an Ambonychia species. However Im not sure if the Georgian Bay formation is exposed at Manitoulin Island.

 

I think you’re the first person to post personal finds from Manitoulin Island here on the forum:popcorn: which I find nice. I’ve seen pics online of corals found from the Niagara Escarpment  of the island and I’ve always dreamt of finding something similar here on the Niagara Escarpment of Hamilton, Ontario.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, JUAN EMMANUEL said:

Fossil #1 looks like an Ambonychia species. However Im not sure if the Georgian Bay formation is exposed at Manitoulin Island.

 

I think you’re the first person to post personal finds from Manitoulin Island here on the forum:popcorn: which I find nice. I’ve seen pics online of corals found from the Niagara Escarpment  of the island and I’ve always dreamt of finding something similar here on the Niagara Escarpment of Hamilton, Ontario.

As far as I know Manitoulin is just part of the Niagara Escarpment, but I don`t know too much about the local geography yet. I`m hoping to get maybe another 1 or 2 fossil hunting trips in this year on Manitoulin. I`ll make sure to post any interesting finds on the forum, so stay tuned.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oldies but goodies! :trilosurprise:

 

Williams, M.Y. 1919
The Silurian geology and faunas of Ontario Peninsula, and Manitoulin and adjacent islands. 
Geological Survey of Canada Memoir,  111:1-195   PDF LINK

 

Caley, J.F. 1936
The Ordovician of Manitoulin Island, Ontario. 

In: Contributions to the study of the Ordovician of Ontario and Quebec. 

Geological Survey of Canada Memoir, 202:21-92   PDF LINK

  • I found this Informative 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/3/2018 at 10:52 PM, piranha said:

Oldies but goodies! :trilosurprise:

 

Williams, M.Y. 1919
The Silurian geology and faunas of Ontario Peninsula, and Manitoulin and adjacent islands. 
Geological Survey of Canada Memoir,  111:1-195   PDF LINK

 

Caley, J.F. 1936
The Ordovician of Manitoulin Island, Ontario. 

In: Contributions to the study of the Ordovician of Ontario and Quebec. 

Geological Survey of Canada Memoir, 202:21-92   PDF LINK

Thanks! I`m sure it`ll make for a good read. Not too old in geologic time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I studied geology at Laurentian University years ago and learned quite a bit about the fossils on Manitoulin from my professor Paul Copper who specialized in the fossils there. From the photos you posted (a little higher resolution would make it easier), here is my take on them based on my studies:

#1 - appears to be a fragment of a brachiopod shell in a rounded smooth piece of limestone.

#2 - appears to be a chunk of honeycomb coral, most likely Favosites

#3 - is a piece of chain coral, most likely Halysites

#4 - are brachiopod shell fragments, you can see some of the internal structure on these

#5 - is a rugose solitary cup coral

#6 - just a nice clean piece of limestone

 

Hope this helps,

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...