Jump to content
JUAN EMMANUEL

Mesohippus bairdi formation?

Recommended Posts

JUAN EMMANUEL

Hi guys,

I recently acquired a piece of fossil Mesohippus teeth that apparently originated from the White River Badlands of South Dakota. The fossil however does not contain any info about what formation it came from. Does anyone have any idea as to what formation it could have come from?  

982BEF67-253F-4FD0-83FE-D045EFE472B0.jpeg.622a7afe30b11f7943b6108e03e4ffa3.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

Brule Formation)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils
13 hours ago, ynot said:

Brule Formation)

Is that the formation for all fossils from the White River?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
piranha

Mesohippus bairdi is not found in the Brule Formation. In the White River Group it is reported from the Chadron Formation:

 

text from:

 

Benton, R.C., Terry, D.O., Evanoff, E., & McDonald, H.G. 2015

The White River Badlands: Geology and Paleontology.

Indiana University Press, 222 pp.

 

Stratigraphic and Geographic Distribution:  The genus first appears in the Duchesnean and became extinct at the end of the early early Arikareean, although there are some questionable records for its presence in the late early Arikareean.  Most specimens of Mesohippus from the White River Group are referred to M. bairdi, which is found in all members of the Chadron Formation.  Mesohippus from the Scenic Member of the Brule are referred to a second species, M. westoni.  Another species, M. exoletus, is reported from the Peanut Peak Member of the Chadron and the Scenic Member of the Brule, and M. barbouri is reported from the Scenic Member of the Brule Formation (MacFadden, 1998).  Outside of the Big Badlands of South Dakota, the genus is widespread and is found throughout the western United States, including Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, and Texas, then north into Canada and Saskatchewan.  It is the first equid known in the southeastern United States and Florida (Patton, 1969).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot
38 minutes ago, Max-fossils said:

Is that the formation for all fossils from the White River?

That is the only one that came up in a google search.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×