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will stevenson

fossils that i have received or found that i dont know what they are

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will stevenson

sorry again, i dont know what the species of these specimens are and also sorry for some reason parts of the photos were cropped and made smaller i think its because i put too much on there so they had to cut down the file size (:

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WhodamanHD

That is an amazing collection!

1.) echinoid

2.) Marine reptile (ichthyosaur?) paddle! Really cool.

3.)echinoid

4.) goniatite

Not sure on good IDs of 5 and 6

7.) Ammonite 

8.) brachiopod

9.) need more views 

10.) vertebra, reptile?

11.) IDK

12.) cephalopod

13.) barnacle (balanus sp?)

14.) trilobite pygidium, got a few guesses as to which type but maybe @piranha would be a better source than I.

15.) more cephalopods  (goniatite, ammonite, etc)

 

Edited by WhodamanHD
Fixing a few terms

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Bobby Rico

Number 7 the ammonite looks like Hildocerss Lusitanicum. Nice too 

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will stevenson

thanks so much i thought that the marine paddle was a calyx or something like that

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RJB

Love the paddle . Really cool!

 

RB

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will stevenson

is it rare? i got given it from someone who had inherited a victorian collection so i don't know much about it

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Bobby Rico

Not incredible rare but a fantastic addition to a collection. Your pictures is a little dark to tell but you may consider getting it prepped to modern standards. I have a lot of fossils found in the Victorian times beautiful labels with some of them, in copper plate text. 

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WhodamanHD

Perhaps fanciful but if I had it I couldn’t help but wondering if it was an Anning specimen.

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Bobby Rico
Just now, WhodamanHD said:

Perhaps fanciful but if I had it I couldn’t help but wondering if it was an Anning specimen.

How fantastic that would be. Maybe the history of this collection could be traced. :)

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BobWill

Very nice. I agree with WhodamanHD but will add that the label is correct on #9 and possibly #5 (other views will confirm) and I'm sure he meant to say  "more cephalopods" instead of more nautiloids for the last image. If you can give us an age, formation or location for the ones you found we may be able to give you more precise names.

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will stevenson

sorry as i said its mostly from a victorian collection so i assume its from england but that's about all the info that i can give, 

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will stevenson
40 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Perhaps fanciful but if I had it I couldn’t help but wondering if it was an Anning specimen.

that would be wonderful if it was, i'll try and trace the collection further to see if there are any links

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will stevenson
1 hour ago, Bobby Rico said:

Not incredible rare but a fantastic addition to a collection. Your pictures is a little dark to tell but you may consider getting it prepped to modern standards. I have a lot of fossils found in the Victorian times beautiful labels with some of them, in copper plate text. 

where could i get something like prepping done, i am  a kid so i don't have the equipment to do it myself also i live in LOndon if anyone knows a place near there which could do it

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Bobby Rico
4 minutes ago, will stevenson said:

where could i get something like prepping done, i am  a kid so i don't have the equipment to do it myself also i live in LOndon if anyone knows a place near there which could do it

Looking at your other pictures I don’t think it needs to be. It is lovely.    :wub:

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will stevenson
27 minutes ago, Bobby Rico said:

Looking at your other pictures I don’t think it needs to be. It is lovely.    :wub:

ok thanks (:

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andreas

pic five looks like an Aptychus of an ammonite

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BobWill
5 minutes ago, andreas said:

pic five looks like an Aptychus of an ammonite

I agree. @will stevenson can you tell us the size of #5 please?

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will stevenson

they are around 10cm tall

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will stevenson

did you mean pic 6 because pic 5 is the 2 bivalves, if so it is around 8cm long

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ynot
1 hour ago, will stevenson said:

did you mean pic 6 because pic 5 is the 2 bivalves, if so it is around 8cm long

It always helps to number each item so We can tell what is which.

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abyssunder

Oh, Roger, you're right about the IDs! I'm not a cephalopod specialist, but specimen 3 is definitely Heliophora orbiculus. I have one of these little and strange echinoids in my collection, and the label says: Heliophora orbiculus (Linne). Unt. Pleistozän, Mauretanien - Nordafrika. :D

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WhodamanHD

Wow, big aptychcus! Awesome.

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will stevenson

ok thanks so much everyone for the identification, it really helps me, just to tell you, i found the apychti in the kimmeridge clays in Dorset, i also found another one but it broke on the journey home

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DE&i

@will stevenson your ichthyosaur paddle would be a special find indeed. Victorian fossil curiosities such as ichthyosaur material are somewhat few and far between. Ichthyosaur specialists such as paleontologist Dean Lomax may be interested in seeing it. 

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