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JUAN EMMANUEL

This is the site where most of the fauna fossils in the pics above came from. The rocks with animals came from certain layers of the Manitoulin formation of the Cataract Group. Apparently the Manitoulin formation has corals and it is the Manitoulin formation that comes after the Whirlpool formation. 

The Manitoulin formation here is shown below the slopes of eroded shale. 

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JUAN EMMANUEL

After making my way up the dry stream I come across the bottom of the falls. There  are loose rocks from different formations at the bottom and most collect at the sides of the falls. 

The rock exposure itself is assigned to multiple formations. 

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The Rochester formation is exposed here and I hope one day I could come across some of its rocks on the bottom.

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doushantuo

Awesome report.

Kudo's,JE.:dinothumb::dinosmile:

 

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Innocentx

Beautiful area with exceptional exposures. You made some nice finds and I enjoyed your report.

 

Patty

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Nimravis

Love the ripple marks.

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Wrangellian

Good report. I like those Conulites especially.

Do you think some of those trace fossils might be mud cracks instead?

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JUAN EMMANUEL
2 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

Good report. I like those Conulites especially.

Do you think some of those trace fossils might be mud cracks instead?

Could be. I believe it depends on the environment of the deposition and this varies with each of the formation shown in the rock exposure. 

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Wrangellian

Yes, it must be hard to sort that out in a place like that.

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TheRealWiwaxia

Really unique place, stay safe on the trail.

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ynot

Nice report on a beautiful location with some nice finds.

Thanks for sharing.

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Bobby Rico

Brilliant report thank you. I liked your photos too and beautiful ripple marks. :wub:

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Ludwigia

I didn't realize until now that you've moved to Hamilton. Thanks for the informative and entertaining report! Looks like a great area to explore. I'll have to get down there next time I come over. Be nice to team up with you. Are you game?

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Monica

Hi Juan!

 

I'm glad to hear that you've found an area close to your new home that may yield some fossil goodies for you - I look forward to seeing all of your future fossil finds!  (And I love the hash plate with Cornulites, by the way!)

 

Monica

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Kane

The trilobite pygidium in the hash plate might be Flexicalymene sp. If Ordovician, it may be F. senaria; if Silurian, there are a number of very nice calymenids reported in the Lockport, Eramosa, and possibly the Amabel Fms (although finding more than partials can be challenging). 

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Fossildude19

Excellent report!  :) 

Thanks for the virtual Field Trip!

Regards,

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JUAN EMMANUEL
5 hours ago, Kane said:

The trilobite pygidium in the hash plate might be Flexicalymene sp. If Ordovician, it may be F. senaria; if Silurian, there are a number of very nice calymenids reported in the Lockport, Eramosa, and possibly the Amabel Fms (although finding more than partials can be challenging). 

The fossiliferous rocks are mostly Silurian. Go below the Whirlpool formation and you’ll find that the Queenston formation is all late Ordovician red shales with no fossils. The rocks that go above the Whirlpool are all Silurian. 

Can Dalmanites be found in the beginning of the Silurian?

 

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Kane
23 minutes ago, JUAN EMMANUEL said:

The fossiliferous rocks are mostly Silurian. Go below the Whirlpool formation, where the Silurian stratas start, and the Queenston is all late Ordovician red shales with no fossils. The rocks that go above the Whirlpool are all Silurian. 

Can Dalmanites be found in the beginning of the Silurian?

 

WRT to Dalmanites, according to Ludvigsen: "This dalmanitid trilobite is relatively common in a number of Lower and Middle Silurian formations in southern Ontario, but complete specimens are essentially confined to the shales of the Rochester Formation." (Ludvigsen, R. (1979) Fossils of Ontario: Part 1 The Trilobites, ROM, p. 65). Dalmanites fragments are reported in the Cataract, which is the lowermost Silurian strata in your area (although the stratigraphic nomenclature may have changed :P ). 

 

Although, in this case, the pygidium doesn't quite look like Dalmanites (as those usually will have evidence of a pygidial terminal spike, and a narrower pygidial axis than your fragment, which puts me more in mind of a calymenid). A closer image may or may not confirm this better.

 

For comparison, here is Dalmanites limulurus from Middleport, NY.  

 

Image from:

Lawrance and Stammers (2014). Trilobites of the World. Manchester: SSP. 

dal.jpeg

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FossilDAWG

Excellent report!  I never visited that site, thought I had read about it in Tom Bolton's GSC publication on the Silurian of the Niagra Escarpment.  I recall that there is a species of calceocrinoid that was described from that locality.  Interesting that the site is still accessible.

 

Don

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Archie

Great report really enjoyed the beautiful location shots!

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