Jump to content
Still_human

Amber inclusions info?

Recommended Posts

Still_human

Are things that had been entirely covered by amber(as opposed to only partially, where it would still be exposed at some point), still soft, with moisture, or does amber somehow draw the moisture out of whatever has been sealed inside, drying it/turning it into a husk?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WhodamanHD

I’ve heard of enhydro inclusions, water in a cavity of the amber, so I don’t think it absorbs it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
snolly50
11 hours ago, Still_human said:

Are things that had been entirely covered by amber(as opposed to only partially, where it would still be exposed at some point), still soft, with moisture, or does amber somehow draw the moisture out of whatever has been sealed inside, drying it/turning it into a husk?

I have seen many insect inclusions in amber that are clearly "husks." Of course it is entirely possible they were desiccated before entombment. It is also common to see insects with bubbles in close proximity. I have always believed these were gases escaping from the dead animal. As WhodamanHD has reported enhydros are also seen, and this would seem to refute the idea that amber absorbs water. There are also bubbles of atmosphere that have been recovered and analyzed. It is my understanding that this has established that atmospheric oxygen levels were once significantly higher.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Still_human
15 hours ago, snolly50 said:

I have seen many insect inclusions in amber that are clearly "husks." Of course it is entirely possible they were desiccated before entombment. It is also common to see insects with bubbles in close proximity. I have always believed these were gases escaping from the dead animal. As WhodamanHD has reported enhydros are also seen, and this would seem to refute the idea that amber absorbs water. There are also bubbles of atmosphere that have been recovered and analyzed. It is my understanding that this has established that atmospheric oxygen levels were once significantly higher.

Yeah, I think you're right about the husks. Or that they were partially exposed. I didn't know about enhydros in amber, but that's probably just cause it never crossed my mind lol. I know of gasses though. This came up because I saw a tiny encapsulated mammal turd from the Cretaceous(or so labeled), and it still filled the entire area, and wasn't loose inside its space, so it didn't look desicated or shrunken like it was dry. I just couldn't help wondering if it was still a gross poop, and that it would be funny if someone was cutting into it to get at it, and the saw blade or drill bit splattered it out on the person--the amber equivant of the flaming paper bag. I wonder if they would feel honored and lucky?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aurelius

I'm sure I've read that, once exposed to the atmosphere, water can very slowly evaporate out of the amber. How true that is, I don't know. But I'm certain you'd never cut into an entirely entombed insect and find any form of moisture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Still_human

So you think the moisture gets drawn out of something fully entombed while still fully hydrated?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aurelius
17 minutes ago, Still_human said:

So you think the moisture gets drawn out of something fully entombed while still fully hydrated?

 

That's what I've heard. I read that water inclusions slowly disappear over time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Still_human
23 hours ago, Aurelius said:

 

That's what I've heard. I read that water inclusions slowly disappear over time.

Oh wow, that's very surprising! Apparently there are enhydro inclusions found in amber these days, so I guess it doesn't all get absorbed, or maybe that's just with younger amber and the water just hasn't had the time to fully be absorbed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot
1 hour ago, Still_human said:

Oh wow, that's very surprising! Apparently there are enhydro inclusions found in amber these days, so I guess it doesn't all get absorbed, or maybe that's just with younger amber and the water just hasn't had the time to fully be absorbed. 

Or while the amber is buried the water can not get out but once it is exposed the water can get out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Still_human
42 minutes ago, ynot said:

Or while the amber is buried the water can not get out but once it is exposed the water can get out.

interesting. That would mean it would have to be pourous. A lot of inclusions I see I think very much look hydrated, like they were just trapped a day before, but time could be a factor, and maybe amber type, too. I think amber from different places can be pretty different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Still_human

I was reading about how it IS a porous  material, and that it's common for inclusions to fall apart immediately if opened up and exposed to air. if it was totally airtight and sealed, the inclusions wouldn't decompose, so that would mean that oxygen is permeating through the amber?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×