Jump to content
The Amateur Paleontologist

A few new Cretaceous fossils in my collection

Recommended Posts

The Amateur Paleontologist

Hey everyone :)

Last week I went to a small mineral/fossil market/exhibition near Lille (northern France). The thing lasted the whole weekend (29th and 30th September) - I managed to get to it just a few hours before it closed.

 

affiche-2020.thumb.jpg.a8814ea71d9eaf10cbe6292f293fe264.jpg

 

 

wasquehal-photo5.jpg.346e47e39e78399fa52d75d36ab2f04a.jpg

 

 

There wasn't much diversity in terms of fossils, but I did spot some rather neat stuff - including some cool vertebrate specimens :)

image_1.thumb.jpg.61d6e45b00a32ff6fa6f201ea8715e3d.jpg

Cephalic 'armour' of a small placoderm (don't really remember from where, tho... :headscratch:)

 

image.thumb.jpg.e2dcff91176386d6426631dfd0a49ca5.jpg

Well-preserved eurypterid from the Silurian of Ukraine

 

 

image_1.jpg.81a000f61f1afd143c99e6631cdf4aa2.jpg

Little array of dinosaur teeth from the Cretaceous of USA (I think the seller mentioned that they were from the Hell Creek Fm.)

 

 

image_2.jpg.33d00532a0ada66242120e40f5f320eb.jpg

More dinosaur (and 1 pterosaur, bottom-left corner) teeth; including 2 Bothriospondylus teeth from Madagascar.. I'd have loved to buy them :( 

 

image.thumb.jpg.26771857f74a4cef6572fb39a773f031.jpg

Well-preserved Keichousaurus from the Triassic of Guizhou province (China).

 

 

I didn't only 'gawk' at the fossils, I also bought a few little things :):

 

 image_3.thumb.jpg.713b97e3a35c9810cf1323ef44e797b8.jpg

2 small ?Lepisosteus fish teeth from the Cenomanian (Cretaceous) of Cap Blanc Nez (coast of northern France)

 

image.thumb.jpg.a3c54d46d8b9bd5a741173ddf222f5e3.jpg

I'm rather pleased I bought this one... :) Associated cranial remains of a small frog (?Ranidae) from the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) of the Hell Creek Formation (Montana, USA). Seller told me that stuff is fairly uncommon..

 

 

Well, that's it ;) Hope you enjoyed this

 

-Christian

 

 

EDIT: The last item (thanks for pointing this out, @jdp!) is actually a Doleserpeton skull from the Permian of Oklahoma... not a Hell Creek Fm. frog skull

-Apologies for any confusion

 

 

 

Edited by The Amateur Paleontologist
"Ranid frog skull from HC Fm." is actually a Doleserpeton skull

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist

@jdp Sorry for my mistake :( you're right, it's definitely a Doleserpeton skull - thanks for pointing this out. I still nevertheless find it pretty cool :)

-Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico
33 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

Doleserpeton is a pretty cool one too - in my opinion :) 

I think that is really cool too. I can’t give you an ID but Doleserpeton is also found in Richards spur quorry Oklahoma I think . The Permian is an really interesting period mainly because I love Dimetrodon .:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anomotodon

And the first two teeth are very likely plesiosaurian rather than Lepisosteus, more pictures would help, but I am pretty sure they are from a ?Polycotylid plesiosaur or, less likely, a crocodilian

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist
5 minutes ago, Bobby Rico said:

I think that is really cool too. I can’t give you an ID but Doleserpeton is also found in Richards spur quorry Oklahoma I think . The Permian is an really interesting period mainly because I love Dimetrodon .:)

You're right - I've seen records of Doleserpeton from the Richards Spur locality :)

-Christian

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist

@Anomotodon the largest tooth is approximately 10mm tall with a 4mm (diameter) base.. isn't that a bit small for a polycotylid tooth, though?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anomotodon
5 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

@Anomotodon the largest tooth is approximately 10mm tall with a 4mm (diameter) base.. isn't that a bit small for a polycotylid tooth, though?

 They can be even smaller, in juveniles, plus Polycotylids were not very large marine reptiles. In addition it's just the bottom half of the tooth. Size is very rarely among determining criteria for tooth ID.

 

Here is mine from Albian of Kanev, Ukraine (?Polycotylidae indet.)

plesiosaur.jpg.a4dcdcd618156a09bcb57b1a4b809421.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist
23 minutes ago, Anomotodon said:

 They can be even smaller, in juveniles, plus Polycotylids were not very large marine reptiles. In addition it's just the bottom half of the tooth. Size is very rarely among determining criteria for tooth ID.

 

Here is mine from Albian of Kanev, Ukraine (?Polycotylidae indet.)

plesiosaur.jpg.a4dcdcd618156a09bcb57b1a4b809421.jpg

Alright :) I'm willing to consider that option.. I'll look through a few papers, and soon I'll post here better quality pictures of my two specimens - to see if that's the right ID

Thanks for the idea, though - I'd be thrilled if my specimens turned out to be polycotylid teeth :D

-Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jdp
10 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

I think that is really cool too. I can’t give you an ID but Doleserpeton is also found in Richards spur quorry Oklahoma I think . The Permian is an really interesting period mainly because I love Dimetrodon .:)

Richard's Spur is where the Dolese Brothers Quarry is. Both names refer to the same place and same deposits.

 

I have seen other Doleserpeton material from other localities but it has not been formally described yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico
1 hour ago, jdp said:

Richard's Spur is where the Dolese Brothers Quarry is. Both names refer to the same place and same deposits.

 

I have seen other Doleserpeton material from other localities but it has not been formally described yet.

Thank you I didn’t know that. I am very new to this material. @jdp can you please have a look at a thread I added a couple of days ago and if you have any thoughts. It would be much appreciated.

@The Amateur Paleontologist I hope you don’t mind me adding a link from your post. If it is a problem l can delete it .

cheers both .

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brittle Star

Hi

Perhaps Someone can put me right here, I thought the export of vertebrate fossilsfrom China were banned.

Very nice collection you have there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby Rico
6 minutes ago, Brittle Star said:

Hi

Perhaps Someone can put me right here, I thought the export of vertebrate fossilsfrom China were banned.

Very nice collection you have there.

Was you talking about the Keichousaurus?  I think a lot of vertebrae fossil from China are band from been exported but Keichousaurus are plenty full and not on part of this ban. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brittle Star

Thank you for the information, so confusing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jdp

All Chinese exports are banned. Some still make it out, though, and there are some fossils that were exported prior to the enforcement of the ban

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jdp
11 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

Thank you I didn’t know that. I am very new to this material. @jdp can you please have a look at a thread I added a couple of days ago and if you have any thoughts. It would be much appreciated.

@The Amateur Paleontologist I hope you don’t mind me adding a link from your post. If it is a problem l can delete it .

cheers both .

 

 

 

I'll give these a look in a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist

I'll post a few more pictures of my polycotylid/fish teeth tomorrow :) It'd be really cool if they turn out to really be poly. teeth!

-Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist

Sorry for the lateness of this post, but there was a slight problem with my computer..

Anyways, here are some more pictures of the most diagnostic tooth - does the polycotylid ID still hold? @Anomotodon

 

BTW., sorry for not great photo quality - hope ID is still possible.. :headscratch:

 

image_1.thumb.jpg.9eb842c852338127cdcd69230363691f.jpg

 

image_2.thumb.jpg.08ed55b8f365142a4897838226aeb0fb.jpg

 

image_3.thumb.jpg.7df06c5b3cdb585d05dbaaeda1db0026.jpg

 

image_4.thumb.jpg.7550edb6607a5894654bab81b2fe50c5.jpg

 

image.thumb.jpg.21a480bb01a8b09223f703945130892c.jpg

 

Just for information, specimen measures ~7 milimetres.

So what do you guys think it is?

 

-Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anomotodon

Definitely a plesiosaur (open pulpar cavity and thick enamel are the diagnostic features of most reptiles, striae and compression are typical of plesiosaurs), not sure about family though, elasmosaurid teeth are very compressed and polycotylids are more conical

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Amateur Paleontologist
13 minutes ago, Anomotodon said:

Definitely a plesiosaur

Thanks for taking the time to ID my specimen - You've just made my day :D By the way, it isn't really clear from the pictures, but the base of the tooth is rather circular and the tooth is overall more conical.. So - Polycotylidae indet. it is, huh? ;) 

-Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anomotodon

Anyway in this preservation the most accurate call is Plesiosauria indet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×