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Jeffrey P

This all started over a year ago. I was selected as Member of the Month and a couple of TFF members from Texas invited me down to the big state to collect. I primarily collect in my home region, the northeast, but I've taken fossil forays to New Mexico, Kentucky, and Germany and was willing to consider a trip to Texas and the opportunity to visit some classic fossil sites and collect fossils that are outside my usual focus. I began planning this about ten months ago, contacted potential fossil collecting partners and did my own research on fossil sites, geology, and the types of fossils I would likely encounter. I had never been to Texas let alone fossil collected there. From the Forum I knew there was a lot of great hunting. Then there was all of the logistics, what to stay, what to bring. Since I wanted to bring back a lot driving appeared to be my best option, but I hadn't driven that far solo in over thirty years. Timing of my trip; mid-late September, came right after my daughter went away to college and I was in the middle of moving to a new place. So things couldn't have been more hectic. Finally, early in the morning on September 8th I set out. Things went okay until I was in Kentucky. Just as it was turning nightfall, torrential rain hit, traffic was stopped on the interstate for two and a half hours, and the last two hours of the trip I struggled with wet conditions and poor visibility. I finally arrived at my parents' house just after one in the morning. 

 

The next day on my way over to my sister's I took a small detour and stopped at an outcrop I was well familiar with in Leitchfield, the Upper Mississippian Glen Dean Formation. 

 

 

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Jeffrey P

I found the usual crinoid and bryozoan specimens that are prolific at the site.  Found my best rugose corals from that site and a crinoid calyx base attached to a stem.. 

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Jeffrey P

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jpc

Ooohh... can't wait to see more.  Organizing trips like this is one of the best benefits of TFF.  

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Jeffrey P

Brachiopods were also prolific. Found quite a number just lying loose on the ground:

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Jeffrey P

I also found Platyceras gastropods and bivalves including this internal mold: 

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Jeffrey P

Both rugose and tabulate corals were common including this Favosites conicus: 

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Jeffrey P

I found a few tiny crinoid holdfasts, some of the more interesting fossils:

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Jeffrey P

Also found a number of nautiloid pieces. Some I still have to reassemble: 

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Jeffrey P

The next day I was headed for Jacksboro, Texas, but along the way I couldn't resist stopping at the Permian site at Waurika. I had never collected any Permian Age fossils before and saw this as a wonderful opportunity. 

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Jeffrey P

The fossils were tiny and I was often on my hands and knees. Fortunately I had just bought some new knee pads: 

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Jeffrey P

I found about a dozen reptile/amphibian teeth. Here are some. Haven't ID'd them yet. I believe at least some are from the amphibian Archeria: 

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Jeffrey P

Also found a large number of teeth from the freshwater shark, Orthocanthus and an unidentified split vertebra as well has an assortment of bone fragments, etc. . I brought back a pail full of matrix material: 

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Jeffrey P

Later that afternoon, I finally arrived at Jacksboro, Texas. I camped at Fort Richardson State Park and TFF member, BobWill joined me for the evening. Bob and I hit the site first thing in the morning. Jacksboro has been on my wish list for a long time. The nearest marine Pennsylvanian sites to my home are way out in western Pennsylvania, more than a day's drive away and those are nothing like Jacksboro. We walked across the dam for Lost Creek Reservoir and then on to the fossil site: 

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piranha

Congrats on a great collecting trip! :fistbump:

 

Campbell 1977 established Huntonia but it was already preoccupied by a modern isopod:

Huntonia Vandel 1973 Family: Philosciidae. Type species: Huntonia montana Vandel 1973

 

Huntoniatonia replaced it in:

 

Jell, P.A., & Adrain, J.M. 2003

Available Generic Names for Trilobites.

Queensland Museum Memoirs, 48(2):331-553  PDF LINK

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Jeffrey P

Bob was a wonderful companion and collecting partner. He was extremely knowledgeable about the site which he says is his favorite. It is in the Finis Shale: : 

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Jeffrey P

On to the finds: There were brachiopods and bivalves: 

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Bobby Rico

Great report, great finds, great photos and I love the Oklahoma Brown Tarantula. :wub: 

 

thanks for for sharing all the best Bobby 

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Jeffrey P

Conularids are rare in my neck of the woods. One day in Jacksboro more than doubled my collection. Here are two: 

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