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Still_human

I just got an awesome coprolite. I generally hate those things, and would never pay money for one, but I came across this one and it has so many visible identifiable remains, I couldn't help being really impressed. Ive always wanted to see a coprolite that had clear remains in it. Sadly they're much smaller and harder to see in person than in these pictures, so I can only use these display pictures for the time being, until I take a magnified look. There's clearly fish scales, seemingly from different types of fish, and apparently squid hooks and such. I'm excited to find a good illuminated magnifying glass and really studying it up close:) Maybe even a microscope to take a closer look!

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caldigger

SH, what critter is this from?

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Coco

Hi,

 

@GeschWhat

 

Coco

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Still_human
10 hours ago, caldigger said:

SH, what critter is this from?

I don't know:/ it is believed to be from an ichthyosaur, but Ive been explained how it's almost impossible to ID a coprolite to a specific species, without unusual circumstances. The identifiable remains could definitely be enough to narrow it, but I would need to take a close look and then talk to an expert, because just "fish and squid" is probably a pretty standard marine reptile diet. 

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LiamL

Really cool. I want to find my own marine reptile poop soon. I find it hard to notice them so unless theres alot of fish scales might be waiting awhile. 

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Still_human
4 hours ago, LiamL said:

Really cool. I want to find my own marine reptile poop soon. I find it hard to notice them so unless theres alot of fish scales might be waiting awhile. 

Yeah, I'd imagine it's super hard to find! Most of all coprolites I see I can't even tell, even knowing it is. I bought this one--I'd never be able to find my own, unless it was laying right behind a skeleton, right where its butt would be. Even then, like you said, unless it had easily visible inclusions, I'd almost definitely overlook it:/

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Anomotodon

Better pictures of the overall shape and inclusions will definitely be helpful (and location info), looks like it's not a shark since sharks have a spiral valve in their large intestine that leaves spiral marks on the coprolites. I believe plesiosaurs had it too, but not sure

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GeschWhat
On 10/9/2018 at 9:19 PM, Still_human said:

I just got an awesome coprolite. I generally hate those things, and would never pay money for one, but I came across this one and it has so many visible identifiable remains, I couldn't help being really impressed.

WHAT! Hate coprolite? BLASPHEMY! There aren't many ways you can get a fossil in a fossil. That is a fine specimen you have there. It looks like it is from the Blue (Lower) Lias around Lyme Regis. Those are some of my favorites. What is fascinating about coprolites is that they can preserve things that would otherwise not survive the fossilization process. Congratulations on what I hope will be the first of many coprolites in your collection.

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Walt
On 10/9/2018 at 9:19 PM, Still_human said:

I generally hate those things

bet you would have really hated holding it before it became a fossil!  :rofl:

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Still_human
45 minutes ago, GeschWhat said:

WHAT! Hate coprolite? BLASPHEMY! There aren't many ways you can get a fossil in a fossil. That is a fine specimen you have there. It looks like it is from the Blue (Lower) Lias around Lyme Regis. Those are some of my favorites. What is fascinating about coprolites is that they can preserve things that would otherwise not survive the fossilization process. Congratulations on what I hope will be the first of many coprolites in your collection.

I just can't get over what they are! I can't help feeling like I'm touching dried poop! Any that have identifiable inclusions are awesome, and I can deal with the whole touching poop thing, but otherwise...well, otherwise it's just poop lol

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Still_human
45 minutes ago, Walt said:

bet you would have really hated holding it before it became a fossil!  :rofl:

Lol exactly! That's all I can think about with them! The smooth glassy surfaced ones like mine aren't too bad, but it seems like most of them are dry and crusty feeling...YUCK!

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Still_human
1 hour ago, Anomotodon said:

Better pictures of the overall shape and inclusions will definitely be helpful (and location info), looks like it's not a shark since sharks have a spiral valve in their large intestine that leaves spiral marks on the coprolites. I believe plesiosaurs had it too, but not sure

Being plesiosaurs, that would of course include pliosaurs too, right?

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LiamL
1 hour ago, Still_human said:

Being plesiosaurs, that would of course include pliosaurs too, right?

I found one today, not as good as yours but still. 

CEAC836A-2800-4890-A315-3EFF710214E1.jpeg

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RJB

Even for Poo, this is purty cool. 

 

RB

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GeschWhat
2 hours ago, LiamL said:

I found one today, not as good as yours but still. 

Some of the most fascinating discoveries that I have found in coprolites were from those that looked unremarkable at first glance. Even tiny fragments can have extraordinary surprises hidden within. Take this tiny fragment. I put it under the microscope and it contained a small jaw fragment. 

Coprolite-Jaw-Teeth-Bull-Canyon-Formation-New-Mexico-2-small.thumb.jpg.23d7703ec0af7b62cc068ef94f3a9333.jpg

3 hours ago, Still_human said:

I just can't get over what they are! I can't help feeling like I'm touching dried poop! Any that have identifiable inclusions are awesome, and I can deal with the whole touching poop thing, but otherwise...well, otherwise it's just poop lol

Hmmm...have you heard about the field test for coprolites? It wouldn't work on those from the Lyme Regis area because they are too dense (and yours looks like it was treated). When I am hunting in the Hell Creek Formation, I use the "lick test." Coprolites from that formation are generally very porous. They stick if you touch them to the tip of your tongue. :D

 

 

 

 

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LiamL
6 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

Some of the most fascinating discoveries that I have found in coprolites were from those that looked unremarkable at first glance. Even tiny fragments can have extraordinary surprises hidden within. Take this tiny fragment. I put it under the microscope and it contained a small jaw fragment. 

Coprolite-Jaw-Teeth-Bull-Canyon-Formation-New-Mexico-2-small.thumb.jpg.23d7703ec0af7b62cc068ef94f3a9333.jpg

Hmmm...have you heard about the field test for coprolites? It wouldn't work on those from the Lyme Regis area because they are too dense (and yours looks like it was treated). When I am hunting in the Hell Creek Formation, I use the "lick test." Coprolites from that formation are generally very porous. They stick if you touch them to the tip of your tongue. :D

 

 

 

 

So if you see poop on the beach give it a good old lick, probably not to something to teach kids.:hearty-laugh:

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Walt
11 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

Some of the most fascinating discoveries that I have found in coprolites were from those that looked unremarkable at first glance. Even tiny fragments can have extraordinary surprises hidden within. Take this tiny fragment. I put it under the microscope and it contained a small jaw fragment. 

Do you ever cut any of them in half for a better look at what is inside?

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GeschWhat
3 hours ago, Walt said:

Do you ever cut any of them in half for a better look at what is inside?

I picked up a tile saw last winter to do just that. Unfortunately, I haven't had a chance to use it. We had absolutely no spring, summer was stifling, and it has been raining almost every day this fall. I have used my dremmel to take the ends off of a few. I have also dissolved quite a few scrap pieces in vinegar in order to see the inclusions. For the most part, I limit myself to surface prep to expose inclusions if there is something I wan't to try to identify.

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Walt
2 minutes ago, GeschWhat said:

I picked up a tile saw last winter to do just that. Unfortunately, I haven't had a chance to use it. We had absolutely no spring, summer was stifling, and it has been raining almost every day this fall. I have used my dremmel to take the ends off of a few. I have also dissolved quite a few scrap pieces in vinegar in order to see the inclusions. For the most part, I limit myself to surface prep to expose inclusions if there is something I wan't to try to identify.

I bet they would look pretty cool cut and polished....

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GeschWhat

Here is a spiral I purchase already cut and polished from the same area as Still_human's. It contains fish scales as well. 

 

 

Spiral-Coprolite-Lyme-Regis-Fish-Scale-Inclusions-1b.jpg

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Walt

I like the colors.... and all the inclusions

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piranha

I think this one fits the thread title... :o @GeschWhat

 

image.png.54b80e9d51f9f1fe15775c0b2ff20171.png

 

figure from:

 

Grimaldi, D., & Engel, M.S. 2005

Evolution of the Insects.

Cambridge University Press, 755 pp.

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ynot
4 minutes ago, piranha said:

I think this one fits the thread title...

Uh, yeah, I would say so!:thumbsu:

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GeschWhat
On 10/12/2018 at 2:14 PM, piranha said:

I think this one fits the thread title... :o @GeschWhat

 

image.png.54b80e9d51f9f1fe15775c0b2ff20171.png

 

figure from:

 

Grimaldi, D., & Engel, M.S. 2005

Evolution of the Insects.

Cambridge University Press, 755 pp.

That is an AMAZING specimen!

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Walt

who says you can't take it with you! :D

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