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daves64

I recently bought some microfossil matrix from the Jasper Creek formation in Bridgeport Texas. Found lots of crinoid stem pieces, some about as big around as the lead from a mechanical pencil, lots of sponge pieces & quite a few Girtyocoelia Sponge ball and chain sponges. I also found what I think is a complete shell, but I'm not sure. Everything else is a tan color, but this is more of a brown & black. When putting it in hydrogen peroxide to try to clean some of the left over matrix of, it floated. So I looked at it with my DinoLite & took some pics of it. Both sides have 2 shots showing different levels & the "hinge" area. It's .5 cm at the widest. 50x magnification.

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg

4.jpg

5.jpg

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Darktooth

If it floated- maybe a seed?

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Herb

small gastropod?

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Brittle Star

Hi

I am not familiar with the area, the shape suggests a bivalve, if it is a fossil. I have found casts as small as a foram in the residue I search.

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daves64

I don't think this is a cast. As to whether it's a fossil or not, I don't know that either. Only that it was covered with a layer of the tan clay matrix & it floats. Found another oddity as well. Seems to be a partial husk of something with some plant material inside. I'll try to get pics posted of it when I get home.

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Al Dente
12 hours ago, Darktooth said:

If it floated- maybe a seed?

I think so too.

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ynot
2 hours ago, daves64 said:

& it floats.

Fossils do not float.

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daves64

So.... should I plant it & see what happens? :headscratch:

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Carl

I'm with the seed believers.

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Carl
1 hour ago, ynot said:

Fossils do not float.

True, most do not. But amber floats in seawater, and there are a few more rare preservations that would float in water, too. Back into my crevice I retreat.

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ynot
1 hour ago, Carl said:

True, most do not. But amber floats in seawater, and there are a few more rare preservations that would float in water, too. Back into my crevice I retreat.

Amber is technically not a fossil, and I have never heard of any other "fossil" that will float without aid.:P

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Al Dente
3 minutes ago, ynot said:

Amber is technically not a fossil, and I have never heard of any other "fossil" that will float without aid.:P

I've had small brachiopods float when loose matrix was dumped into water.

brachiopods on penny small.jpg

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ynot
15 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

I've had small brachiopods float when loose matrix was dumped into water.

Well now I have heard of floating fossils!

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Kane
3 minutes ago, ynot said:

Well now I have heard of floating fossils!

They do fairly well if you sail them on small boats. :D 

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ynot
2 hours ago, Kane said:

They do fairly well if you sail them on small boats. :D 

Big boats too!:P

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Carl
4 hours ago, ynot said:

Amber is technically not a fossil, and I have never heard of any other "fossil" that will float without aid.:P

Amber is most certainly a fossil by the definition of a fossil as any evidence of life from a previous geologic time period. Plant resin is evidence of ancient plants and technically a kind of body fossil.

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ynot
17 minutes ago, Carl said:

 the definition of a fossil as any evidence of life from a previous geologic time period.

You left out a word in Your definition....LITHIFIED. (should be between ANY and EVIDENCE.)

Sorry, but amber is not  classified as a rock. It is a biologic compound. Therefore it can not be a fossil, just really old plant goo.

I know that in common vernacular it is considered a fossil but in a technically scientific sense it is not a fossil.

 

At least that is how I lernt it.:D

Regards,

Ynot, nut case for lithified life!

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Carl
14 minutes ago, ynot said:

You left out a word in Your definition....LITHIFIED. (should be between ANY and EVIDENCE.)

Sorry, but amber is not  classified as a rock. It is a biologic compound. Therefore it can not be a fossil, just really old plant goo.

I know that in common vernacular it is considered a fossil but in a technically scientific sense it is not a fossil.

 

At least that is how I lernt it.:D

Regards,

Ynot, nut case for lithified life!

I respectfully disagree. I purposely left out the word because there is no good reason to include lithified in the definition and many reasons to exclude it. I used to favor a preservation-based definition until I looked into other definitions and how the word was actually being applied. The age-based definition includes all the things that most paleo treatments consider fossils and excludes many that these same treatments wouldn't consider so. If you are having insomnia I can send along an essay I wrote delving deeply into this issue further justifying this case.

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