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ziggycardon

Fossils in Helsinki Finland?

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ziggycardon

Hi everyone!

 

In a few days I am going to Helsinki in Finland to visit my girlfriend who is currently studying there.
But now was my question, are there any fossils to be found in or around Helsinki?
I suppose baltic amber might be found at beaches, but does anyone know of other things or specific places where one could find anything?
I won't be taking any digging materials with me, so I am really looking at things you can just pick up like amber, shark teeth, fossilized bivalves or stray fossils in boulders (don't know if it is a proper translation but zwerfsteenfossielen as we call them in Dutch). 
If anyone known anything that would really be helpfull! 

Also does anyone know anything about the fossil laws in Finland and does anyone know any fossil or mineral shops in Helsinki?

Thanks in advance!

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Raggedy Man

Hey Wil! Lol sorry. I did some reseach and found that most of the bedrock is granite, but I did find this post on TFF from 2013. It looks like Baltic amber might be your only option. I hope this helps.

 

 

I hope this helps.

 

Best regards, 

Paul

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ziggycardon
3 hours ago, Raggedy Man said:

Hey Wil! Lol sorry. I did some reseach and found that most of the bedrock is granite, but I did find this post on TFF from 2013. It looks like Baltic amber might be your only option. I hope this helps.

 

 

I hope this helps.

 

Best regards, 

Paul

Yeah I read that topic too, I was just hoping for some stray fossil locations, but baltic amber it is then! :)
Hopefully the natural history museum has a giftshop with some local fossils, really hoping to get a Finnish trilobite there from Åland. 

Although apparently urban fossil hunting is also an option as it appears, my girlfriend just sended me this picture of an orthoceras she found in a cathedral, I suppose it dates back to the ordovicium. 

44136745_2331990977024506_2387835704420859904_n.thumb.jpg.9150159e84fb56ea3421528334072d9e.jpg

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Raggedy Man

I love it when they use fossils like that. The John Wayne International Airport by Anaheim, California has ammonites tiles all over the place. Good luck on your adventures and I hope you find some great pieces! 

 

Best regards,

Paul

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DPS Ammonite
On 10/15/2018 at 1:47 AM, ziggycardon said:

...I am really looking at things you can just pick up like amber, shark teeth, fossilized bivalves or stray fossils in boulders (don't know if it is a proper translation but zwerfsteenfossielen as we call them in Dutch). 

 

I wonder if you mean that the  "stray" boulders with fossils have been transported a distance away from the original deposit by floods or glaciers. 

 

Consider contacting a Finnish paleontological society to ask them about the laws and where to collect. Hopefully you can find a common language (English?).

 

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Johannes

Collecting fossils in Finland is challenging ;) Only option is to look for them in erratic boulders in the surrounding of very hidden palaeozoic meteorite impact structures... A lot of interesting magmatic and metamorphic rocks there, but nearly no fossils...

 

But you may pay a visist to the Natural History Museum in Helsinki, which has quite nice exhibitions. And if you want to collect by yourself, you should consider a day trip to visit Estonia, where a lot (really a lot) of paleozoic fossil rich shores can be found at the western Islands...

 

 

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Oxytropidoceras

Unfortunately for fossils, a person will have to go to Sweden or Norway.

 

Calner, M., Ahlberg, P., Lehnert, O. and Erlström, M., 2013.

The Lower Palaeozoic of southern Sweden and the Oslo 

Region, Norway. In Field Guide for the 3rd Annual 

Meeting of the IGCP project (Vol. 591, pp. 1-96).

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272447841_The_Lower_Palaeozoic_of_southern_Sweden_and_the_Oslo_Region_Norway_Chapter_Oslo_Region_Norway

http://resource.sgu.se/produkter/rm/rm133-rapport.pdf

http://portal.research.lu.se/ws/files/3214270/4178766.pdf

 

Bruton, D.L., Gabrielsen, R.H. and Larsen, B.T., 2010. 

The Caledonides of the Oslo Region, Norway–stratigraphy 

and structural elements. Norwegian Journal of Geology

/Norsk Geologisk Forening, 90(3).

https://njg.geologi.no/images/NJG_articles/NJG_3_2010_Bruton_hoy1.pdf

 

David L. Bruton, Naturhistorisk Museum, University of Oslo.

 J.Fredrik Bockelie, Sagex, and others, 2008, Classical fossil 

localities in the Oslo area. 33 IGC excursion No 104, August 10th, 2008

http://iugs.org/33igc/fileshare/filArkivRoot/coco/FieldGuides/No 104 Classical Fossil Localities.pdf

 

Bergström, S.M. and Ahlberg, P., 2004, September. Guide 

to some classical Ordovician and Cambrian localities in the 

Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden. In International 

Symposium on Early Palaeozoic Palaeogeography and 

Palaeoclimate (Vol. 5, pp. 81-90). Erlangen: Erlanger 

geologische Abhandlungen–Sonderband.

http://sarv.gi.ee/igcp503/IGCP503/page/Fagelsang.pdf

 

Lindström, M., B., Schmitz, E., and Sturkell, Ormö, J., 2008

Palaeozoic impact craters, 33 IGC excursion No 10, August 15 – 20, 2008

http://iugs.org/33igc/fileshare/filArkivRoot/coco/FieldGuides/No 10 Palaeozoic Impact Craters.pdf

 

Ojala, V. J., and Iljina, M., 2008, Metallogeny and tectonic

evolution of theNorthern Fennoscandian Shield. 

33 IGC excursion No 15, August 15th – 21st 2008

http://iugs.org/33igc/fileshare/filArkivRoot/coco/FieldGuides/No 15 Metallogeny Northern Fennoscandia.pdf

 

Vajda, V., and Gravesen, L. P., 2008, Mesozoic of Southern 

Scandinavia 33 IGC excursion No 9, August 15 – 18, 2008

http://iugs.org/33igc/fileshare/filArkivRoot/coco/FieldGuides/No 9 Mesozoic Southern Scandinavia.pdf

 

Yours,

 

Paul H.

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