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prod

It is the tusks of a baby woolly mammoth?

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prod

Hello.

Found in permafrost, Yakutia, Russia. I made a bet with a friend that is a mammoth Tusk, and he claims it's not a Tusk! Thank you.

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Rockwood

Looks more like a horn sheath to me.

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prod

they weren't processed. have a natural look.

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-AnThOnY-

Tusk wouldn't be hollow, so that pretty much rules out tusk.

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Coco

It reminds me of the "horizontal" teeth of a hippopotamus, but the end (the pointy tip) intrigues me...

 

Coco

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Al Dente
18 minutes ago, -AnThOnY- said:

Tusk wouldn't be hollow, so that pretty much rules out tusk.

They are hollow at the base. Here a photo from this site- https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2018/04/18/i-spent-years-with-illegal-ivory-traders-heres-what-i-learned/?utm_term=.0cf1f5deb65c

tusk.PNG.099eaa81a6d7023ebfbbf3bb0a2af075.PNG

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-AnThOnY-

Agreed, but not at the tip that he has :) 

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Al Dente

Here are three examples that are even smaller from the paper "Deciduous tusks and small permanent tusks of the Woolly Mammoth found on the beaches of the Netherlands".

tusk2.JPG

tusk3.JPG

tusk4.JPG

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Harry Pristis

 

These elephantoid milk tusks are found in Florida occasionally:

 

 

mam_eleph_tusk.JPG

masto_eleph_tusk.JPG

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Innocentx
4 hours ago, Coco said:

It reminds me of the "horizontal" teeth of a hippopotamus, but the end (the pointy tip) intrigues me...

 

Agree the tip ends are unusual in their growth and almost seem to be branching.

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abyssunder

I never had the opportunity to study proboscidean deciduous or very young permanent tusks, but I'm inclined to believe that the specimens in question might be something like that. Also, I could be wrong.
The possible scenery might be something like:
Both "tusks" have lost the tip cup of enamel, so what may be visible in the tapering end might be the dentine following the same shape of a complete tusk-end with the enamel preserved, maybe more branched. Next in line, might be the cementum cover of the dentine running along the tusk, narrowing to a thin end where the pulp cavity is larger.

 

received_1752138935101426.jpeg.b428729d86455595d5186d8aec6a84a5.jpg.3d81ebb2f00a58469668ce7876f06616.jpgquaternary-01-00007.thumb.jpg.2e1a7c58341b17667589df4857391e69.jpg

 

Thanks to Eric, Harry, and the authors of the document mentioned above (D. Moll et al. 2018), making the collected specimens available for further study.

 

 

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prod

the base of the Tusk is called alviola. it's always hollow. These samples are of interest for science. They can indicate the reason why the mammoths in life sharpened(stitch) the ends of his tusks. Yes, part of sheath tip of the tusks broke loose, but in doing so she revealed the tips of the tusks. I'm assuming these are mammoth milk tusks, which means they've been replaced by permanent tusks.

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