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avonnieda

Hi guys, first fossil, first post :)

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avonnieda

 

   Hi folks!

 

   My wife and I love to collect shark teeth at Englewood Beach in South West Florida. I came across what looks to me like a small piece of petrified wood, but it seems like it's unusual to find such a thing in that area on the beach. Can you help me determine what I've been carrying around in my pocket for a while? 

 

   Thanks very much! 

 

      -Adam vonNieda

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Edited by avonnieda

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Manticocerasman

not wood, but a piece of bone ;)

 

and welcome to the forum :)

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Fossil-Hound

Due to the noticeable porosity this must be a piece of mammal bone though I'm not sure from what mammal. Most likely cetacean. It might only be a couple hundred or thousand years old and still in the process of per-mineralization (fossilizing). Interesting find.

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The Amateur Paleontologist
1 minute ago, Manticocerasman said:

not wood, but a piece of bone ;)

 

texture says it all (especially in the 3rd picture) - they're both right, definitely bone you've got there :)

-Christian

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avonnieda

Thanks for the confirmation folks, much appreciated :)

 

   -Adam 

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Bronzviking

Welcome to the forum from Sunny Florida! I shark tooth hunt here often and I was told by hunters on the the beach that most of the tumbled pieces of bone are whale bone. (but it could be any mammal, land or sea, just not identifiable) Yes it does have a woody texture sometime. Have you found any teeth bigger than an inch? Any Megs? Would like to see some.

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avonnieda

Hi Bronzviking, thanks for the info! No Meg teeth yet, biggest we've found on the beach is about 1/2 inch. Seems like that's more of a dive type thing to find those. Hoping to spend more time down there in the next year or so, and maybe I'll get certified and try my luck! :)

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digit

Nothing to add for the ID that others have already said (a fossilized bone fragment--somewhat common down here in South Florida). When you make it back to Florida, consider fossil hunting in the Peace River. You can either rent a canoe from Canoe Outpost (Arcadia, FL) or check into one of the various guides that will provide the equipment and knowledge to make it a productive day. Fossils from the rivers can be in much better shape than some that are rolling in the surf at the beaches. Do an internet search for "florida peace river fossil hunting" and you'll find lots of information. Much to learn about Florida fossils on this very forum (which tends to appear near the top of most search engine results). :)

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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avonnieda

Thanks Ken, we'll do that! 

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MrR

The texture looks a lot like this bit of "chunkosaurus", which prompted my first post on TFF. The one I have is larger, and was identified as a mammal of some sort. I do not know if they are in the same state of fossilization, etc. Mine makes a ceramic, chime-like sound when I strike it with something hard, FWIW. Cheers.

 

My chunk o'bone.

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Innocentx

Welcome to the forum, neighbor!  Kansas City area has great fossils.

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avonnieda
13 minutes ago, MrR said:

The texture looks a lot like this bit of "chunkosaurus", which prompted my first post on TFF. The one I have is larger, and was identified as a mammal of some sort. I do not know if they are in the same state of fossilization, etc. Mine makes a ceramic, chime-like sound when I strike it with something hard, FWIW. Cheers.

 

   Yes, same here on the sound it makes, it's very much like that. It's very hard. 

Edited by avonnieda

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avonnieda
12 minutes ago, Innocentx said:

Welcome to the forum, neighbor!  Kansas City area has great fossils.

Thanks! 

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Bronzviking
7 hours ago, avonnieda said:

Hi Bronzviking, thanks for the info! No Meg teeth yet, biggest we've found on the beach is about 1/2 inch. Seems like that's more of a dive type thing to find those. Hoping to spend more time down there in the next year or so, and maybe I'll get certified and try my luck! :)

Diving is a great idea. Also after a storm it is possible to find a meg. A kid found one as big as our hand after a storm on the beach. I found mastodon enamel on Englewood beach but didn't know what I had till just recently. I read that tusk fragments also were found on the beaches, so keep looking. :D

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