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KCMOfossil

This looks arthropod, but what is it?

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KCMOfossil

This specimen is from the Pennsylvanian subsystem, Kansas City group, and probably the Winterset member.  I say probably because I collected it several years ago and I'm not sure.  If it is not from Winterset, then it is from a some other nearby member in the Kansas City Group.  It seems that the only arthropods in the Winterset are trilobytes, so I'm thinking that this is not arthropod, even though it has that superficial appearance.  Can you folks help me identify it?

 

 

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040b86d1e807f0c046ad493cd949dda4816bc387-3S_1280 (2).jpg

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piranha

eurypterid: Adelophthalmus sp.

 

image.thumb.png.7c3675810eb60f32b8aded10dde9a8fd.png

 

figure from:

 

Tetlie, O.E., & Dunlop, J.A. 2005

A redescription of the Late Carboniferous eurypterids Adelophthalmus granosus von Meyer, 1853 and A. zadrai Přibyl, 1952.

Fossil Record, 8(1):3-12   PDF LINK

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Innocentx

What ti looks like to me.

 

 

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Fossildude19

Nice bit of Eurypterid there! 

Congratulations! :) 

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KimTexan

Very cool.

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Innocentx

I am :envy:

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KCMOfossil
4 hours ago, Innocentx said:

What ti looks like to me.

Thanks @Innocentx for the nice link.  I hope @Missourian will take a look at my specimen.

 

3 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Nice bit of Eurypterid there!

Thanks, @Fossildude19.  I am quite excited about this.  I found it several years ago and have looked at it a number times wondering what it was.  But recently there was a post about Eurypterids and I thought they looked like my fragment.  The literature I had, however, said nothing about Eurypterids, so I thought it was likely to be something else.  I am quite excited with this ID. :megdance:

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KCMOfossil
On 11/1/2018 at 6:35 PM, piranha said:

eurypterid: Adelophthalmus sp.

 

 

figure from:

 

Tetlie, O.E., & Dunlop, J.A. 2005

A redescription of the Late Carboniferous eurypterids Adelophthalmus granosus von Meyer, 1853 and A. zadrai Přibyl, 1952.

Fossil Record, 8(1):3-12   PDF LINK

Thanks so much @piranha  This is quite an exciting identification for me.  In looking more carefully at it now, I wonder if more of the specimen may be hidden under matrix.

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Al Dente

I wouldn’t rule out a flattened nautiloid.

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Rockwood
14 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

I wouldn’t rule out a flattened nautiloid.

Maybe not but the ghostly nature of it does seem more eurypterid like to me.

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Al Dente
2 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

Maybe not but the ghostly nature of it does seem more eurypterid like to me.

Looks like it is preserved in an open marine limestone. Usually articulated eurypterids are found in low energy muddy environments. I don’t think they had highly mineralized exoskeleton that would preserve in this type of environment. I could be wrong.

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Rockwood
3 hours ago, Al Dente said:

Looks like it is preserved in an open marine limestone.

Perhaps a limey mud that was deposited as a unit, sort of Burgess shale style ?

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KCMOfossil
4 hours ago, Al Dente said:

I wouldn’t rule out a flattened nautiloid.

That would make more sense for the Winterset Limestone member.  The fact that the specimen is a fragment limits the identification potential.  In addition, the specimen lacks detail (in contrast to the specimen posted by Missourian in the link above).  I hadn't thought of nautiloid, but it clearly seems like a possibility.

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Missourian

When I first saw it associated with brachiopods, a flattened nautiloid came to mind. But then you mentioned Winterset.... The Cordaites leaves and wood scattered sporadically throughout the upper Winterset, which represents a diverse variety of shallow, near-shore environments, have given me a nagging feeling that an eurpyterid would turn up some day (Cordaties was present where I found the eurypterid in the Wyandotte fm.) I hope your specimen is the first.

 

Is any fine detail visible? If so, could you take some close-up images? (Edit: I just saw your post above re: lack of detail).

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KCMOfossil
4 hours ago, Missourian said:

close-up images?

Thanks Missourian.  I did take a few closeups, but no detail shows up.  I wonder if more of the specimen may be under the matrix.

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KCMOfossil

Here are a view of the verso of the piece and one more.5bdcd54edde05_CIMG7233(2).thumb.JPG.6ccf627c456e4a0fad46d740106f22b3.JPG5bdcd55f56af6_CIMG7235(2).thumb.JPG.86dba8d2b8c2c09d2e5eb1135c1fac49.JPG

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