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Darktooth

Squalicorax kaupi Anomaly?

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Darktooth

I have a question for you all pertaining to a Squalicorax kaupi tooth that I found while hunting with Frank at Ramanessin brook this past summer. I have hunted in thebrooks a fair number of times over the years and have collected a good amout of Squalis in that time. The tooth in question has a feature that I have not seen on any of the other teeth that I have found. Located on the mesial side of the root lobe there are serrations. I wouldn't really call this a cusp per se.  I assume that this could be a feature that could very easily be worn off by the nature of being tumbled in the brooks. I have not seen, heard mention of, or read anything about this feature in the past. So my question is, has anybody else seen this, or could this hold some scientific value?

20181104_125900.jpg

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Darktooth

 

 


@Trevor @Carl  for some reason I am having trouble summoning @frank8147 and@ thejerseydevil.

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caldigger

Dave, you must write them as they are listed.

@frankh8147

@The Jersey Devil

 

I have done that several times myself. You must include all the capital letters and spaces between words or the system doesn't recognize the name.

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The Jersey Devil

Hey darktooth, it is a Squalicorax kaupi. I call all of the S. kaupi teeth here as S. "kaupi" as it contains more than one Squalicorax species. This feature is not serrations or a cusplet, but rather a mesial notch that is found in some teeth. It is mentioned on elasmo. Here's one that I have similar to this one:

 

Kaupi-Anterolateral-6-768x767.jpg

 

 

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Darktooth
2 hours ago, caldigger said:

Dave, you must write them as they are listed.

@frankh8147

@The Jersey Devil

 

I have done that several times myself. You must include all the capital letters and spaces between words or the system doesn't recognize the name.

Thanks Doren, it was driving me nuts.

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Darktooth
1 hour ago, The Jersey Devil said:

Hey darktooth, it is a Squalicorax kaupi. I call all of the S. kaupi teeth here as S. "kaupi" as it contains more than one Squalicorax species. This feature is not serrations or a cusplet, but rather a mesial notch that is found in some teeth. It is mentioned on elasmo. Here's one that I have similar to this one:

 

Kaupi-Anterolateral-6-768x767.jpg

 

 

Thank-you! I appreciate the info. For some reason I tend to forget about Elasmo as a resource.  But then again I would rather come to the forum and ask our awesome members.:)

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frankh8147

I'm way late to the party but agree with the the assessment. 

 

Nice tooth!!

 

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Darktooth
31 minutes ago, frankh8147 said:

I'm way late to the party but agree with the the assessment. 

 

Nice tooth!!

 

As they say " better late, than never!"

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Carl

I agree with S. kaupi.

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non-remanié
On 11/4/2018 at 5:03 PM, The Jersey Devil said:

Hey darktooth, it is a Squalicorax kaupi. I call all of the S. kaupi teeth here as S. "kaupi" as it contains more than one Squalicorax species. This feature is not serrations or a cusplet, but rather a mesial notch that is found in some teeth. It is mentioned on elasmo. Here's one that I have similar to this one:

 

Kaupi-Anterolateral-6-768x767.jpg

 

 

 

What you mean to say is someone who's opinion you seem to trust recently told you that there may be more than species being lumped into NJ Kaupi.  And you adopted the exact  strategy that person suggested to you for labelling these NJ teeth

 

 

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The Jersey Devil
1 minute ago, non-remanié said:

 

What you mean is that you trust someones opinion who recently told you that there may be more than species being lumped into NJ Kaupi.  And you adopted the exact  strategy that person  suggested to you for labelling these NJ teeth.   

 

 

 

It wasn't just you. It's on elasmo.

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non-remanié
21 minutes ago, The Jersey Devil said:

 

It wasn't just you. It's on elasmo.

Never said I was.  But you were calling them all lindstromi until our recent discussion.   Which is completely fine to do because it really doesn't matter much.  

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The Jersey Devil
26 minutes ago, non-remanié said:

Never said I was.  But you were calling them all lindstromi until our recent discussion.   Which is completely fine to do because it really doesn't matter much.  

 

I mean they're just names I guess. I preferred the quotations because they imply the uncertainty.

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MikaelS

Apart from specimens of S. yangaensis-type there are two common Squalicorax in the mid-Campanian to early Maastrichtian of the Atlantic coastal plain region. These are typically referred to as S. pristodontus and S. kaupi. The former is actually intermediate between S. lindstromi (type stratum is uppermost lower Campanian) and typical mid- to upper Maastrichtian S. pristodontus. The second species is undescribed and may well be restricted to North America (Case 1978 described specimens from Montana that belong to this species). Superficially it looks very much like juveniles of the S. lindstromi/pristodontus group but a closer examination reveals rather consistent differences. The labial root/crown boundary typically forms a gently curved arch in juvenile and adult S. lindstromi/pristodontus (i.e., a concave crown base) but rarely so in the undescribed taxon (see Lauginiger & Hartstein, 1983, pl. 1, fig. 4). The labial foramina are larger, less numerous and a bit more randomly distributed in the undescribed species. An asymmetrical root is also more commonly seen in the new species. I should have formally described this taxon years ago but there are always too many competing projects. The nominal S. kaupi is imo a nomen dubium but most likely based on material of the S. lindstromi/pristodontus group.

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Darktooth

Just so we are clear on this my question wasn't about species. It was regarding the mesial notch. Not the distil notch that all the Squalis I have found , seem to possess. Does anyone else have any comments or info about that?

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MikaelS

A mesial notch may be present in several Campanian Squalicorax. It's rare to see this in species of the S. lindstromi/pristodontus group but quite common in the undescribed taxon mentioned above.

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