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Amber Fluid Neutral

Lizard tail in Cretaceous Burmese Amber Kachin State mines

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Amber Fluid Neutral

Although lizards are prime material for fakers, i think this tail is authentic.  It is an unusial cast fossil.  Kind of like a ghost form.  It seems that the tail became detached.  Much like they do today. This is cenomanian age amber. From Myanmar kachin state. 

s-l1600 (1).jpg

s-l1600.jpg

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Fossildude19

Looks like skin, rather than an actual tail. :headscratch:

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doushantuo

dazawagnerstanleybauergrimaldi

(1,3 MB)

Sci Adv. 2016 Mar; 2(3): e1501080.
Published online 2016 Mar 4. doi:  [10.1126/sciadv.1501080]
PMCID: PMC4783129
PMID: 26973870
Mid-Cretaceous amber fossils illuminate the past diversity of tropical lizards
Juan D. Daza,1,* Edward L. Stanley,2,3 Philipp Wagner,4 Aaron M. Bauer,5 and David A. Grimaldi6
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer

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PFOOLEY

Tail skin. :)

 

 @Amber Man

 

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Amber Fluid Neutral

Its a hollow cylinder in the shape of a tail.  I guess this is how some of these lizards are preserved. Look online for pictures of these types. 

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PFOOLEY
Just now, doushantuo said:

Now there is lizards in amber. :dinothumb:

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Rockwood

I think it's most likely shed skin. It's easy to picture them needing a little sticky help getting that last section started.

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Tidgy's Dad

Yes, a tail slough, I think.:)

Very nice indeed. 

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indominus rex

Definitely lizard shed skin.

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Amber Fluid Neutral

Thanks.  It is likely a skin tube then. What type of lizard? This is cretaceous age.  The oldest found in amber. Did lizards have the ability to detach tails back then?

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Kane
28 minutes ago, Amber Fluid Neutral said:

Did lizards have the ability to detach tails back then?

In this case, it isn't a tail detachment but a skin shedding. There are a few academic papers that discuss reptile skin fragments in Cretaceous amber.

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Carl

I agree that it is mostly likely a shed but lizards are know from there for which the bones, for whatever bizarre taphonomic reason, have either disappeared or become invisible. Check this lizard ghost out:

 

amber_lizard_daza_2017_09_04.thumb.jpg.5b16d271e5f56ec04a44deb63c5d3146.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

And, bizarrely, it's feet still seem to be solid! 

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Amber Fluid Neutral

That is what I was saying. I saw this one before. Well either way.  The scale pattern and shape are preserved.

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Rockwood
57 minutes ago, Carl said:

for whatever bizarre taphonomic reason, have either disappeared or become invisible.

Maybe they were nearly transparent to begin with ?

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Carl
55 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

And, bizarrely, it's feet still seem to be solid! 

Exactly! And you can see it's humeri and at least one femur!

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Carl
1 minute ago, Rockwood said:

Maybe they were nearly transparent to begin with ?

Bones and guts and all?!

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Rockwood
1 minute ago, Carl said:

Bones and guts and all?!

Fish do it fairly often, don't they ?

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Carl

Here another one:

amber20lizard202.png.9899f0a1ff27953e8d31ddea0ecf4e18.png

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Carl
Just now, Rockwood said:

Fish do it fairly often, don't they ?

I guess nothing's impossible.

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Rockwood
1 minute ago, Carl said:

Here another one:

This shot makes me wonder if the see through look is maybe more illusion that actual.

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abyssunder

You have a really nice specimen! :)

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Rockwood
4 hours ago, Rockwood said:

I think it's most likely shed skin. It's easy to picture them needing a little sticky help getting that last section started.

Problem. :headscratch:

I've been studying a snake skin shed. The scales are concave because the skin is inside out, and the head is split into two sections for some way from the tip.

This tail seems to have convex scales and the anterior end is purse stringed looking instead of split.

It's become easy to see a bird plucking away the body of a trapped animal or dropping the tail in pursuit of the animal.

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Amber Fluid Neutral

Thanks guys.  Worth the 135 dollars or no? Are you allowed to discuss values? 

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PaleoNoel

I really don't know about the values and I'll leave that up to you. But is it possible that the transparency is from the internal bacteria of the lizard digesting the actual body after it had become encased in resin? That could explain why it only appears to be an impression of the body (while there also appears to be a few of the bones scattered on the inside) 

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