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corporateidentity

Advice for Temnospondyli fossil hunting in Pennsylvania :)

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corporateidentity

Hello everyone.

 

I am an incredibly novice fossil hunter from Pennsylvania.  From where I live, it is heavy Carboniferous territory.  One of the items on my bucket list is to eventually find something from a temnospondyl, even if it is nothing more than a trackway or even better - a bone fragment!  Would anyone be willing to share with me advice on what to look for / or what has helped them in finding anything from a Temnospondyl or Lepospondyl?

 

Do they appear more in certain rocks than others?  

 

I live in the Pittsburgh area, near where Fedexia was discovered ten years ago.  I'm hoping to eventually find something related to Fedexia or another temnospondyli. 

 

From what I'm realizing, these little guys are hard to come by.

 

Any advice?

 

Thanks everyone! 

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Fossildude19

@corporateidentity

 

I would read any scientific papers you can get on Fedexia striegeli , and the Casselman Formation, and the Conemaugh Group

Search  Google with these words in quotation marks, and the word PDF after it. ;) 

Look for outcrops of the formation nearby the discovery site. Streams, ravines, and roadcuts are your best bets. 

Good luck.  :) 

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Paul1719

So I have been working on a project at Red Hill looking for more tetrapod material. Last trip on a rainy day I spent with Doug Rowe, he showed me a topo map with many abandoned strip mines that are being reclaimed in the Bitumen area (where they get the "clean" coal, LOL). I would love to get in there and look around but my time is limited and there is a lot of rock to move at Red Hill. I have to believe the abandon strip mines must have vertebrate fossils. Is that true? I've never heard of any from St Clair which obviously has been worked extensively. 

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corporateidentity

I don't think I've searched at Red Hill but that is certainly a good lead! Apparently there is a good spot in Ambridge PA (that supposedly has amphibian jaw fragments) that people search at and supposedly find some neat stuff but I haven't been there yet. 

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corporateidentity
16 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

@corporateidentity

 

I would read any scientific papers you can get on Fedexia striegeli , and the Casselman Formation, and the Conemaugh Group

Search  Google with these words in quotation marks, and the word PDF after it. ;) 

Look for outcrops of the formation nearby the discovery site. Streams, ravines, and roadcuts are your best bets. 

Good luck.  :) 

Thank you Fossildude!

 

I've been obsessed with Fedexia and temnospondyl ever since I found out that they were around during the Carboniferous. I've searched in a lot of streams but so far no luck but it makes me happy you gave me that advice so I must be headed in the right direction :)

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Petalodus12

Not to be the bearer of bad news, but amphibian material is incredibly rare around Pittsburgh. I’ve hunted there for 10 years and although I know of some nice vertebrate sites that yield disarticulated fish and shark remains, I haven’t seen any amphibian material. Yes, Fedexia was found here, but it was an anomaly and is a holotype. In the scientific paper the researchers state that they are not sure exactly what member it came from, as it was not found in situ.  Plus, the original site is not open anymore (I believe it has been riprapped). However, certain sites near Pittsburgh (like Linton) that are coal spoil piles have yielded articulated amphibian remains. Unfortunately, I believe that Linton is now on private property. So the moral of the story is that yes, you can find amphibian remains near Pittsburgh, but they are incredibly rare and often disarticulated. I do hope you find another Fedexia though. Happy Hunting!!

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Scylla

I have been able to dig at Red Hill twice with the New York Paleo Society. We just have to show the researchers what we find and they reserve the right to keep scientifically important finds. I got to keep everything I found. You can join Here

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