Jump to content
FranzBernhard

Terebralia (horn snails) from "Fuggaberg-6", St. Josef, Austria, Styria

Recommended Posts

Tidgy's Dad

Nice report and lovely specimens!:)

Thanks for sharing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG

Wonderful preservation! :wub: You also seem to have some nice variety of species there.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
33 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Nice report and lovely specimens!:)

Thanks for sharing. 

Thanks! You are welcome!

Just ol´ molluscs, but I like them :).

10 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

Wonderful preservation! :wub: You also seem to have some nice variety of species there.

Thanks! Some are quite nicely preserved, some are not so...

There are about 200-300 mollusc species described from the "Florianer Schichten". But a revision is really overdue!

Franz Bernhard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UtahFossilHunter

Now that's some detail! Those are beautiful.:wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Monica

Beautiful molluscs! :drool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
18 hours ago, UtahFossilHunter said:

Now that's some detail! Those are beautiful.:wub:

 

7 hours ago, Monica said:

Beautiful molluscs! :drool:

Thanks for your appreciations!
Despite being just ol´ gastros and bivs, I also like them very much.

Franz Bernhard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darktooth

Nice finds! The Gastros are beautiful! The matrix pieces are my favorite. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie

Very interesting report and beautiful specimens :) 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian

Nice spot you've found there! The preservation/concentration reminds me of the Whiskey Bridge site in Texas (which I've not been to but have some specimens from).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
21 hours ago, Darktooth said:

Nice finds! The Gastros are beautiful! The matrix pieces are my favorite. 

Thanks! I also like the matrix specimens more then the loose ones. And these gastros are super-abundant localy.

19 hours ago, Archie said:

Very interesting report and beautiful specimens :) 

Thanks for your appreciation! I am a little bit surprised, that so many of you find these snails beautiful. Maybe its the geometric chessboard pattern that is rather unusual and somewhat appealing?

As all of you may have noticed, these Terebralia are not really cleaned. But only the remaining dark matrix between the small rectangular, bright nodes makes them appealing. I have one or two of them totally cleaned, every bit of matrix between the nodes removed. Now, these are not so appealing anymore...

13 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Nice spot you've found there! The preservation/concentration reminds me of the Whiskey Bridge site in Texas (which I've not been to but have some specimens from).

Thanks! I have found several such rich spots in this area (about 30 km2) during about 2 years of prospecting :). Fossils are superabundant here, but outcrops are very rare... But now I have several dozens of spots to choose from; from many spots I have not even one fossil...

The diversity of molluscs is great (200-300 species are described), but some of them are clearly dominating in most outcrops (> 90%): Granulolabium bicinctum; Granulolabium plicatum; Turritella partschi; Terebralia lignitarum; Vitta picta; Crassostrea gryphoides, Tellinid bivalves (hard to collect, nearly always broken) and maybe Linga columbella. Some of them nearly exclude each other: E.g. Granulolabium and Turritella. They have different habitats, intertidal vs. shallow subtidal.

Franz Bernhard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie

The pattern on these Terebralia certainly is very aesthetically pleasing and I definitely agree that leaving the matrix between the nodes highlights this all the more! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeffrey P

Those specimens are exquisite. I love the idea of modern looking shells in rock. Congratulations and thanks for sharing them.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian

I would take them either way, cleaned or not, but I do like a specimen in matrix, I suppose because it shows that it is a fossil and not a modern snail.  ;)

Do you consolidate your matrix with anything, or is it more or less firm enough without consolidant to hold up to handling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
18 hours ago, Jeffrey P said:

Those specimens are exquisite. I love the idea of modern looking shells in rock. Congratulations and thanks for sharing them.

Thanks, you are welcome! And another matrix-fan out there ;)!

 

11 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

I do like a specimen in matrix

...and the next matrix fan :)!

 

11 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Do you consolidate your matrix with anything, or is it more or less firm enough without consolidant to hold up to handling?

In most cases (>99%), the matrix is stable enough to allow easy handling without crumbling, no consolidation necessary. If it is not stable enough, I am applying a water-diluted multi-purpose glue to the still damp specimen. Thats usually sufficient.

But there is one exception: The tellinid bivalves. If you are lucky enough to recover a +/- complete one, the shells are usually cracked and tend to fall off the matrix when the specimen tries out. In this case, I am applying a few drops of water-diluted multi-purpose glue to the still damp shell. Thats sufficient to hold the fragmented shell stable on the matrix. Examples of such fragmented and stabilized shells:

https://www.franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Peronae_Panopea.html

Btw, the one in the lower left corner was one of the first of this type I have recovered. It looked stable, I did not stabilize it - a few weeks later, large parts have been fallen off...

Franz Bernhard

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

Neet looking shells.

Wonderful report, thanks for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jpc

Nice shells.  Looks like you have had a lot of fun looking for the elusive outcrops.  Good work.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
16 hours ago, ynot said:

Neet looking shells.

Wonderful report, thanks for sharing.

You are welcome, ynot!

13 hours ago, jpc said:

Nice shells.  Looks like you have had a lot of fun looking for the elusive outcrops.  Good work.  

Thanks! Yes, discovering a new fossil site is always thrilling and satisfying.

Franz Bernhard

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
niber

Hi Franz Bernhard

this is a very interesting topic we have in the south of France very similar miocene outcrops
the mollusc fauna looks very similar

010.JPG.150b9eb04fb6734d875c10282e38446c.JPG

 

012.JPG.43dbe6e37b69444681553a977b675ff1.JPG

 

013.JPG.f8c58dd1e580a05ff653ab6bdbef7778.JPG

 

015.JPG.f10c5d1850730e9813ce95cf9b4dd5d8.JPG

 

014.JPG.726605243dc85982e44b740f78d017a3.JPG

011.thumb.jpg.21137ee12059cbea98117c14adf078cf.jpg

 

011.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
21 hours ago, niber said:

we have in the south of France very similar miocene outcrops
the mollusc fauna looks very similar

Yes, very similar! Very nice, thanks for sharing!

This stuff is relatively abundant through central and southern Europe - Greetings from the Paratethys sea :).

Btw, if someone is interested in visiting "Fuggaberg-6", here are the directions, unfortunately in german (and with outdated taxonomy... ;).)

https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Fossilfundstellen_Internet_Fuggaberg_6.pdf

Franz Bernhard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
niber

detailled fauna from French's outcroops

5.jpg.b85fc2b6eff2f05d9722821752798204.jpg

 

IMG_9047.JPG.3ee9932439df8e93ac8d5b1be5aeabf1.JPG

 

ocenebra.thumb.jpg.3a0cd70b3ef398a2e18e0551129ad14a.jpg

 

5bfd81e7ea202_perronasp.thumb.jpg.47ece2d55ddff9b014e6e19d1836f682.jpg

 

5bfd820084f5c_Sanstie2.thumb.jpg.8b2864449d0f1e53b9e72a9e245c2e43.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×