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will stevenson

Are these even fossils, or are they modern?

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will stevenson

i picked these up seperately the horse tooth in italy and the corals in barbados a few years ago,

i was just wondering if they are fossils or modern as as far as i know the places where i was weren't known for

fossils but the look kind of like fossils

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will stevenson

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will stevenson

Ok thanks I thought that that would be the answer it's just that the honeycomb coral looked as if it was mineralised as there were small crystals and some parts had reflective surfaces like quartz so I was just wondering

 

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Al Dente
20 minutes ago, will stevenson said:

i picked these up seperately the horse tooth in italy

Not a horse tooth but a cow tooth.

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Bronzviking
2 hours ago, caldigger said:

All look modern to me.

 

These are especially delicious in a bowl with milk!

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You might break a tooth on that honeycomb, Lol. :D

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caldigger

Don't they sell "Extra Crunchy"?!  :wacko:

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Bronzviking
2 hours ago, will stevenson said:

Ok thanks I thought that that would be the answer it's just that the honeycomb coral looked as if it was mineralised as there were small crystals and some parts had reflective surfaces like quartz so I was just wondering

 

If the honeycomb coral has crystals it could be agatized, which means it would be considered a fossil. :)

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Harry Pristis

 

For comparison:

 

 

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Raggedy Man

They might not be fossils, but they're still a cool find. I would display these with their fossil relatives. Would be interesting to compare the differences through evolution.

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will stevenson

thanks everyone for your help

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will stevenson
17 hours ago, Bronzviking said:

You might break a tooth on that honeycomb, Lol. :D

ha lol

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abyssunder

Is it true?
" Tectonic forces raised the seafloor until coral reefs could form - and continued to raise the entire area out of the water. The whole base of the island is an ancient coral reef." - as stated here

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will stevenson
1 hour ago, abyssunder said:

Is it true?
" Tectonic forces raised the seafloor until coral reefs could form - and continued to raise the entire area out of the water. The whole base of the island is an ancient coral reef." - as stated here

So you think the coral From. Barbados is fossilized?

 

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abyssunder
58 minutes ago, will stevenson said:

So you think the coral From. Barbados is fossilized?

 

You have not specified the geological settings of your find, so there could be no conclusion.

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Bronzviking
22 minutes ago, abyssunder said:

You have not specified the geological settings of your find, so there could be no conclusion.

I just googled this info if this helps.

Geology of Barbados. The geology of Barbados includes exposures of reef-related carbonate rocks spanning 85 percent of the island's surface. This Coral Rock Formation is 70 meters thick and dates to the Pleistocene.

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abyssunder

The fossil coral fauna reported from Barbados contains:
Acropora cervicornis
Acropora palmata
Montastraea annularis (Orbicella annularis)
Montastraea cavernosa
Montastraea nancyi (Orbicella nancyi)
Porites porites
Diploria sp.

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will stevenson
19 hours ago, abyssunder said:

You have not specified the geological settings of your find, so there could be no conclusion.

south coast on a beach

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will stevenson
18 hours ago, Bronzviking said:

I just googled this info if this helps.

Geology of Barbados. The geology of Barbados includes exposures of reef-related carbonate rocks spanning 85 percent of the island's surface. This Coral Rock Formation is 70 meters thick and dates to the Pleistocene.

ok thankyou

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Harry Pristis

 

Considering that Pleistocene sea-levels were as much as 300 feel lower than today, all the Barbadian corals exposed today must be fossils.  I don't know the condition of the coral since the end of the Pleistocene, but I've never heard of a living "Barbadian coral reef."

 

 

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will stevenson
On 04/12/2018 at 6:56 PM, Harry Pristis said:

 

Considering that Pleistocene sea-levels were as much as 300 feel lower than today, all the Barbadian corals exposed today must be fossils.  I don't know the condition of the coral since the end of the Pleistocene, but I've never heard of a living "Barbadian coral reef."

 

 

oh no there are lots of actual corals there i have found several beautiful purple fan corals washed up on the beach

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Harry Pristis
1 hour ago, will stevenson said:

oh no there are lots of actual corals there i have found several beautiful purple fan corals washed up on the beach

 

Fan corals, Will, are not reef-builder corals.

 

 

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will stevenson
20 hours ago, Harry Pristis said:

 

Fan corals, Will, are not reef-builder corals.

 

 

oh ok i just thought that they would grow on the calcite base of other corals in a reef

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