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David in Japan

Maybe 2018's last fossil hunt in Japanese late cretaceous

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Tidgy's Dad

Thanks, David. 

Very interesting report and nice photos. 

Love the 'cycad', great find. :)

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David in Japan
19 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Thanks, David. 

Very interesting report and nice photos. 

Love the 'cycad', great find. :)

 thank you but I just noticed that all the pictures I posted are too bright.

 

Love this imprint too! First time I found one and it was a nice surprise. It was kindly waiting on the top of a scree.:wub:

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gigantoraptor

Cretaceous shark teeth in Japan? I love it.:wub: Does Squalicorax occur there?

Awesome trip it seems. 

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Wolf89

That's such a diverse spot! Shark teeth plants and ammonites. That's pretty cool. David is the formation hard or soft?

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Very nice report, locations and fossils :D Thanks for sharing it!

Just to know, what's the length of that 'mystery bone'?

-Christian

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David in Japan
21 minutes ago, gigantoraptor said:

Cretaceous shark teeth in Japan? I love it.:wub: Does Squalicorax occur there?

Awesome trip it seems. 

Yes, Squalicorax sp. and Squalicorax falcatus.There is a lot of species here (about 18) but you can't take it directly from the formation. So it depends highly on your luck to find a rock containing it and as they are very fragile, teeth usually look more like a puzzle than a tooth when you come back home.

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David in Japan
11 minutes ago, Wolf89 said:

That's such a diverse spot! Shark teeth plants and ammonites. That's pretty cool. David is the formation hard or soft?

Not really hard mudstone but it chips really easily. it can be messy sometimes.

 

There is a lot of fossils there, plants, vertebrates (marine reptile, dino, shark and fish), invertebrates ( shell, urchin, ammonite and heteromorph). The thing is that besides bivalves, they are not well preserved.

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David in Japan
6 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

Very nice report, locations and fossils :D Thanks for sharing it!

Just to know, what's the length of that 'mystery bone'?

-Christian

Just 2cm long. It isn't really big at all. I first though that it was some kind of turtle bone but it may just be my imagination but it looks a little bit to a  worn radius.

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KimTexan
4 minutes ago, David in Japan said:

Yes, Squalicorax sp. and Squalicorax falcatus.There is a lot of species here (about 18) but you can't take it directly from the formation. So it depends highly on your luck to find a rock containing it and as they are very fragile, teeth usually look more like a puzzle than a tooth when you come back home.

That is when you carry a bottle of cyanoacrylate with you and stabilize it in the field. I have started doing that. I have had a mishap or 2 with it though. I put it in a ziplock bag to prevent it from spilling in my bag. It spilled and ate through the ziplock plastic. But still the glue has helped me preserve many a fossil.

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David in Japan
2 minutes ago, KimTexan said:

That is when you carry a bottle of cyanoacrylate with you and stabilize it in the field. I have started doing that. I have had a mishap or 2 with it though. I put it in a ziplock bag to prevent it from spilling in my bag. It spilled and ate through the ziplock plastic. But still the glue has helped me preserve many a fossil.

Using it too when I can see the fossil before breaking the rock however shark teeth inside rocks tend to "explode":yay-smiley-1: when I open the rock. 

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Bobby Rico

Lovely photos of the landscape and its flora. I really like the plant material too. Great report thank you

 

 @David in Japan I sent you something in the post on Monday don’t know when your get it but please just let me know when it arrived. Just a little Christmas present.  

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David in Japan
8 minutes ago, Bobby Rico said:

Lovely photos of the landscape and its flora. I really like the plant material too. Great report thank you

 

 @David in Japan I sent you something in the post on Monday don’t when your get it but just let me know when it arrived. Just a little Christmas present.  

 

Thank you Bobby ! 

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The Amateur Paleontologist
38 minutes ago, David in Japan said:

Just 2cm long. It isn't really big at all. I first though that it was some kind of turtle bone but it may just be my imagination but it looks a little bit to a  worn radius.

I know I've already posted this paper elsewhere..., but it might be a useful source for ID'ing that bone :) - Sato etal(2012)_Review of Japanese marine reptiles.pdf

-Christian

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David in Japan
2 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

I know I've already posted this paper elsewhere..., but it might be a useful source for ID'ing that bone :) - Sato etal(2012)_Review of Japanese marine reptiles.pdf

-Christian

Thank you Christian, This paper is really useful but there is not a lot of data about the marine reptile found in the Himenoura formation (maybe too fragmentary) but very good source :) and free^^

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The Amateur Paleontologist
11 minutes ago, David in Japan said:

Thank you Christian, This paper is really useful but there is not a lot of data about the marine reptile found in the Himenoura formation (maybe too fragmentary) but very good source :) and free^^

 

This is the best I could find about Himenoura vertebrate material...

5c0be70582e37_ScreenShot2018-12-08at16_43_33.png.71c0388cf95acfcb96ab4bbe327155c1.png

 

-Christian

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David in Japan
2 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

 

This is the best I could find about Himenoura vertebrate material...

5c0be70582e37_ScreenShot2018-12-08at16_43_33.png.71c0388cf95acfcb96ab4bbe327155c1.png

 

-Christian

Yes, info about vertebrate are very scarce. Bivalves and sharks are well studied but turtle, and marine reptile aren't so well.

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The Amateur Paleontologist
1 minute ago, David in Japan said:

Yes, info about vertebrate are very scarce. Bivalves and sharks are well studied but turtle, and marine reptile aren't so well.

I heard about a paper on a Himenoura theropod tooth (Tsuhiji et al. 2013) but one has to pay to get access to it :( - and I doubt it'd have much relevance for ID'ing your specimen...

-Christian

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David in Japan
2 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

I heard about a paper on a Himenoura theropod tooth (Tsuhiji et al. 2013) but one has to pay to get access to it :( - and I doubt it'd have much relevance for ID'ing your specimen...

-Christian

It's a Tyrannosaurine (I think they said Gorgosaurus) tooth found near Ushibuka in the upper part of the formation. I don't have the paper but remember the presentation.

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FossilsAnonymous

@David in Japan really cool finds. Love to see the sharks

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Innocentx

Looks like good places to hunt with nice countryside and waters. Have you found the little crab fossils where you hunt?

 

Impressive scaphopods!

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