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Pilobolus

Pseudofossils, Pareidolia, And Other Rorschachery

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Pilobolus

Post 'em if you got 'em...

An armored jaw-less fish...obviously.

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claire01

Part of an ichthyosaur skull:post-7100-0-16448600-1411152747_thumb.jpg

But that might just be because I suck at fossil ID :)

Edited by claire01

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claire01

It's just part of an ammonite. But it wasn't until I got it home and cleaned it up that I was able to see the suture lines.

Edited by claire01

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John K

A friend of mine sent me this photo and was hoping it was part of a pelvis:


20140501_044522_resized.jpg

I replied that it was really a clutch of raptor eggs: one missing, one (on the right) intact, and one (on the left) broken with the baby raptor still curled up inside.

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TqB

Lower Carboniferous jellyfish, actually just a compaction cone complete with radial striae (and brachiopod fragment), had me wondering for a while though...

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tmaier

In Indiana I came across a creek bed that had cut into some limestone strata. I immediately saw a "skull" that had me going for a while, but then looking around I realized that this eroded limestone was making all kinds of interesting convoluted shapes. I collected "vertebra", "limb bones", and "ribs", and then I put them next to the "skull" to make a "deer". It was pretty awe-inspiring from 20 feet away. :D

I wonder if anybody found that critter, and reported it to the Smithsonian.

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Pilobolus

Juvenile theropod skull found in a dry wash in Keystone, Colorado, 1997.

Note the fabulous (and rare!) soft tissue preservation of the eyes.

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Pilobolus

I hesitate to put this one in here as I think it might be a worked piece of cherty material. When I nabbed it, on-edge, it looked clam-like tho'

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painshill

“Chrysanthemum Stone” (celestine) from Yonghe in China.

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Dendritic pyrolusite on Late Jurassic limestone from Solnhofen in Germany. This fascinating moss was the principal nesting material for the Archaeopteryx found in the same strata. ;)

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“Desert Owl” (gypsum concretion) from Tunisia.

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"Zebra Stone" (sedimentary quartz with cerisite) from the east Kimberley, Western Australia

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Pyrite “egg” from Hunan, China (layed by a goose, obviously) :D

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Edited by painshill

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claire01

I have to say, though, that "chrysanthemum stone" is lovely, painshill :)

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Pilobolus

Those are some lovely examples painshill...love the owl.

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fossilized6s

300 myo "Peace sign", Mazon creek nod.

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A primate ear cleverly disguised as a Fiddlehead. Very rare! ;)

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Wrangellian

Lower Carboniferous jellyfish, actually just a compaction cone complete with radial striae (and brachiopod fragment), had me wondering for a while though...

attachicon.gifIMG_1518 - Copy.JPG

attachicon.gifIMG_1517 - Copy (2).JPG

What is a compaction cone, pray tell??

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Coco

Hi,

“Chrysanthemum Stone” (celestine) from Yonghe in China.

attachicon.gifChrysanthemum Stone.JPG

What it is really? Some time ago, I saw many photos of that...

Coco

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FossilDAWG

Cool topic.

Some of these objects would definitely give me a heart attack if I saw them in the field, especially that "placoderm skull".

Don

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Pilobolus

Cool topic.

Some of these objects would definitely give me a heart attack if I saw them in the field, especially that "placoderm skull".

Don

Pseudofossil of the Month?

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Harry Pristis

. . .

Dendritic pyrolusite on Late Jurassic limestone from Solnhofen in Germany. This fascinating moss was the principal nesting material for the Archaeopteryx found in the same strata. ;)

attachicon.gifPyrolusite.jpg

. . .

Apparently these are manganese dendrites, but not pyrolusite.

MINDAT.ORG

Pyrolusite

Rutile Group

Usually found as matte-black powdery to fibrous crusts, sometimes in botryoidal aggregates or columnar, more rarely as druzes of small prismatic to tabular, dark grey metallic crystals.

NOTE: No valid pyrolusite dendrites are known. Supposed specimens of pyrolusite in dendritic form turn out to be other Mn-oxide species (e.g., minerals of the cryptomelane group, birnessite, nsutite, todorokite, etc.) upon being examined in the proper laboratory setting for characterizing these difficult to identify minerals. See Potter, R. and Rossman, G, 1979, Mineralogy of Manganese Dendrites and Coatings, American Mineralogist, v. 64, p. 1219-1226

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Pilobolus

some kind of bird-billed camel.

Edit: with the flaming hair and wedge-shaped tail, I'm sure it is with the Paleo-Pokemon lineage.

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Edited by Pilobolus

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Auspex

some kind of bird-billed camel.

Edit: with the flaming hair and wedge-shaped tail, I'm sure it is with the Paleo-Pokemon lineage.

This Pokemon was called "Pi".

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Pilobolus

This Pokemon was called "Pi".

Took a while to dawn on me, but at least it wasn't 3.14159 days before I caught on.

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ZiggieCie

My 400 million year old Fossilized Golf ball.

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tmaier

My 400 million year old Fossilized Golf ball.

Silly you... golf wasn't invented until the cretaceous. :D

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Uncle Siphuncle

My 400 million year old Fossilized Golf ball.

attachicon.gif400MYA - Fossilized Golfball-1.jpg

I have a few that look almost identical from the Silurian Waldron Shale.

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