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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The third group (Dipterids). they have specific oblong dental plates in lower jaw and there (except Conchodus) usually are many tooth rows. :)

The first dental plate (identified as Conchodus) is 5 mm length, the other is 3 mm length and incomplete. :)  

conchodus tooth 1.jpg

dipteridae tooth 1.jpg

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The fourth group is Chirodipterids. The dental plates have more oblong rectangular shape with horizontal lower edge, odontodes are visible in upper half of surface. 

The both dental plates are 5 mm length. :)

chirodipteridae tooth 1.jpg

chirodipteridae tooth 2.jpg

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The fifth group is Phaneropleurids. Triangular shape of dental plates is common, similar as Harajicadipterus. :)

The size of dental plate is 7 mm length. 

phaneropleuridae tooth 1.jpg

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The sixth group- possible stem Lepidosireniformes. I saw in wikipedia that they appeared about 400 million years ago and I have found two dental plates with sharp tooth rows similar as Gnathorhiza, however there are five rows when Gnathoriza has 3 rows. But I think the ancestry is possible. :) The both dental plates are 3-4 mm length. 

lepidosireniformes ancestor 1.jpg

lepidosireniformes ancestor 2.jpg

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Neat! You seem to have documented very well the Lithuanian Devo-Carbo lungfish fauna :) Looking forward to some more updates!

-Christian

Edited by The Amateur Paleontologist

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The other type is specific tooth plates from lower jaw. the size is between 3 and 7mm length. :)

lepidosireniformes ancestor 3.jpg

possible sagenodontidae tooth 1.jpg

unidentified lungfish tooth 2.jpg

unidentified lungfish tooth x.jpg

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doushantuo

Nice work,DN!

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

The other toothplate- Ctenodus sensu strictos in better quality! :D 6 mm length.

ctenodus lungfish tooth.jpg

ctenodus tooth 2.jpg

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

And the last are unidentified- from 3 mm to 1 cm length, the genera or families would be helpful. :)

unidentified lungfish tooth 3.jpg

unidentified lungfish tooth 5.jpg

unidentified lungfish tooth 6.jpg

unidentified lungfish tooth 7.jpg

unidentified lungfish tooth 8.jpg

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

Notice that 4 th unidentified dental plate has thickest tooth row in short edge! :D It would be interesting to know which genera it would be typical to. :)

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D.N.FossilmanLithuania

Dear Christian and Doushantuo,

 

Thank you very much for kind answers, I wish there could be someone who knows fossil lungfishes good in this forum! :D

Merry Christmas to you! :)

 

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ynot

Very nice teeth and pictures.

Sorry I can not help with IDs, maybe @Fossildude19 will know.

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Archie

These are really cool specimens! I cant help with I'd though either sorry, all I know is the ones I find (very rarely) in the Upper Carboniferous formation I hunt are usually a Ctenodus sp. if the ridges are parallel and a Sagenodus sp. if they are radiating.

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