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UtahFossilHunter

Let’s see your collecting vehicles!

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UtahFossilHunter

Fossils are found in pretty diverse locations. This requires many different modes of transportation. From cars, to boots, to boats let’s see your favorite way to get to those eurypterids, brachiopods, and dinosaurs! 

For starters, here are my favorite modes. 

My trusty Salomon Quest 4D 3 GTX’s get me around the desert where my bike can’t go.

BFF3ADBA-0819-428F-A634-10CE4510FA1C.thumb.jpeg.ff1bb08e7af83d7c769247ebaa3d1f02.jpeg

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UtahFossilHunter

Speaking of my bike, it’s a 2009 Trek Fuel Ex 7 trail bike.

 

D3C455ED-EF0C-4059-B300-75D3742F3C51.thumb.jpeg.8a16c5234fbe5143dd0c6c8afb731ee4.jpeg

 

 

 

Here it is from my “Hunting on a Bike” thread1FE36538-7496-4FFF-B746-25D9EF3D4284.thumb.jpeg.db7a27579f9ec3b44176fe6f909cb2b0.jpeg

 

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UtahFossilHunter

If I can, I use my old 1992 Yamaha Kodiak. Now, let’s see yours!

73EC1023-0A97-4994-87FB-30B6C2F6CD5A.jpeg

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FossilsAnonymous

@UtahFossilHunter interesting thread. I don't think MomAnonymous would appreciate me taking a pic of her hands on the steering wheel though ;)

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UtahFossilHunter
25 minutes ago, FossilsAnonymous said:

@UtahFossilHunter interesting thread. I don't think MomAnonymous would appreciate me taking a pic of her hands on the steering wheel though ;)

There’d be no judgment from me. My parents had to drive me around for years. When I got my driving license, they told me to drive myself because they were retiring from the chauffeur business.:ighappy:

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Heteromorph
On 12/30/2018 at 11:29 AM, UtahFossilHunter said:

My trusty Salomon Quest 4D 3 GTX’s get me around the desert where my bike can’t go.

I have heard that they are a bit too warm, at least for Texas weather. Have any problems with them in Utah? Do they breath well?

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UtahFossilHunter
1 hour ago, Heteromorph said:

I have heard that they are a bit too warm, at least for Texas weather. Have any problems with them in Utah? Do the breath well?

They are more breatheable then the other boots I’ve had (Rocky, Keen, Denali). I wore them when I was hunting for pet wood and dinosaur footprints in June and July in Southern Utah. They aren’t as airy as say a running shoe or sandals but they aren’t bad for a boot breathability wise and definitely not the hottest (the cheap Denalis get that honor). I’d say they were one of the cooler pairs I’ve worn.

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KimTexan

I use a lot of different footwear when hunting depending upon the environment  and weather.

My favorite hiking boots are my Danner boots. They’re the best I’ve ever had. And they are the most lightweight I’ve had. I’ve had them at least 10 yrs. I’m always amazed by how the seem to wick they moisture away from my feet. They are very water resistant as long as I don’t completely submerge them and water goes in the top. The sole began to come off earlier this year. I finally got the sole put back on at a shoe shop. They actually stitched them on this time. I haven’t tested the water resistance of them since then. 

A16D927E-C5A5-4401-9EBA-D3663F413FD2.thumb.jpeg.cae8d24277900dedcb1214ed7f461b10.jpeg

 

Then there are my trusty rubber boots. Nothing special about them. They are the boots you can get at Home Depot for people who pour concrete. This is from a week ago while out hunting. I got into a little mud Christmas Eve. Not too bad. I spend a lot of time in creeks. 

7BD8BFD3-C815-4A46-A595-F8826EFF236F.thumb.jpeg.874bb5abcfd0a483220953b7167ade89.jpeg

 

The next pair I bought recently. I’ve had a few instances where the water in the North Sulfur River is deeper than my boots above can handle. It’s prevented me from hiking further in and getting at the good stuff and places less hunted. I don’t mind getting a little wet, but when it’s in the 30s-40s I’d rather not get wet.

I had a hunting trip planned with @believerjoe and female hunting buddy of mine in mid December. It had rained a lot and I knew the water would be over 2 feet in places.

So I bought these for all of $25 on clearance. They worked great and were really comfortable. They are now added to my hunting gear that I keep in my car. They cinch up around the thigh and then you can loop them around your belt or a belt loop.

C40B9C19-2E7E-48FA-A803-743A8F734F90.thumb.jpeg.eba03d4f7404191af0071ec83951136a.jpeg

 

 

I had a pair of Teva hiking sandals that I’ve had for over 20 yrs, but the bottom half of the soles started coming off this summer while hiking in the North Sulfur. I had to hobble along back to my car. I haven’t gotten them glued back together. But that would be my option for the summer. Except there tends to be a lot of wild hog  excrement in the river and feeder creeks when the water isn’t flowing much. It gets pretty nasty and I hate the thought of walking in it with those in stagnant pools. Yuck!

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Kane

Depends on terrain. For the honey hole near my house, I used an old pair of Skechers until they were quite literally falling to pieces. I threw them out before taking a photo of them, forgetting to do a cheeky homage to Van Gogh's famous "Peasant Shoes" (Heidegger's analysis of that painting went so far as to say the shoes remained authentic works/objects of art just so long as the owner of them never came to realize them as such :D ). 

 

I'm very hard on footwear, so that is where I can't skimp unless I want to buy footwear every 6-12 months. For excavation work, I need the most sturdy, rugged, and durable work boot I can get, and it has to have nearly 5-10 pounds of steel in them (toe, sole, heel). I plunked down a good chunk of change a few years back on a pair of Terra that are oil-proof, spark-proof, slip-resistant, and safety standard rated out the wazoo (important when visiting quarries that require proper safety gear). Not much breathability at all, but it makes all the difference if a whole shelf of rock falls on your foot... Or, alternatively, to anchor in when using a pry bar, or just kicking the rocks. :D Suffice it to say, you can't move too fast in them... so if one is collecting where there are bears, I guess it means having to stay and fight. :P 

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UtahFossilHunter
25 minutes ago, KimTexan said:

I use a lot of different footwear when hunting depending upon the environment  and weather.

My favorite hiking boots are my Danner boots. They’re the best I’ve ever had. And they are the most lightweight I’ve had. I’ve had them at least 10 yrs. I’m always amazed by how the seem to wick they moisture away from my feet. They are very water resistant as long as I don’t completely submerge them and water goes in the top. The sole began to come off earlier this year. I finally got the sole put back on at a shoe shop. They actually stitched them on this time. I haven’t tested the water resistance of them since then. 

 

Then there are my trusty rubber boots. Nothing special about them. They are the boots you can get at Home Depot for people who pour concrete. This is from a week ago while out hunting. I got into a little mud Christmas Eve. Not too bad. I spend a lot of time in creeks. 

 

The next pair I bought recently. I’ve had a few instances where the water in the North Sulfur River is deeper than my boots above can handle. It’s prevented me from hiking further in and getting at the good stuff and places less hunted. I don’t mind getting a little wet, but when it’s in the 30s-40s I’d rather not get wet.

I had a hunting trip planned with @believerjoe and female hunting buddy of mine in mid December. It had rained a lot and I knew the water would be over 2 feet in places.

So I bought these for all of $25 on clearance. They worked great and were really comfortable. They are now added to my hunting gear that I keep in my car. They cinch up around the thigh and then you can loop them around your belt or a belt loop.

I had a pair of Teva hiking sandals that I’ve had for over 20 yrs, but the bottom half of the soles started coming off this summer while hiking in the North Sulfur. I had to hobble along back to my car. I haven’t gotten them glued back together. But that would be my option for the summer. Except there tends to be a lot of wild hog  excrement in the river and feeder creeks when the water isn’t flowing much. It gets pretty nasty and I hate the thought of walking in it with those in stagnant pools. Yuck!

You really got those muddy! A good pair of hiking boots can last years with proper care as you know with your Danner boots. That’s good to know about the waders though. I haven’t needed waders for fossil hunting yet. 

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UtahFossilHunter
9 minutes ago, Kane said:

Depends on terrain. For the honey hole near my house, I used an old pair of Skechers until they were quite literally falling to pieces. I threw them out before taking a photo of them, forgetting to do a cheeky homage to Van Gogh's famous "Peasant Shoes" (Heidegger's analysis of that painting went so far as to say the shoes remained authentic works/objects of art just so long as the owner of them never came to realize them as such :D ). 

 

I'm very hard on footwear, so that is where I can't skimp unless I want to buy footwear every 6-12 months. For excavation work, I need the most sturdy, rugged, and durable work boot I can get, and it has to have nearly 5-10 pounds of steel in them (toe, shank, heel). I plunked down a good chunk of change a few years back on a pair of Terra that are oil-proof, spark-proof, slip-resistant, and safety standard rated out the wazoo (important when visiting quarries that require proper safety gear). Not much breathability at all, but it makes all the difference if a whole shelf of rock falls on your foot... Or, alternatively, to anchor in when using a pry bar, or just kicking the rocks. :D Suffice it to say, you can't move too fast in them... so if one is collecting where there are bears, I guess it means having to stay and fight it. :P 

 If you’re in a quarry, steel-toed boots are probably more safe to have than my lightweight hiking boots. You could always try kicking them. I bet a good kick with those would make a bear rethink eating you for a minute. :ighappy:

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Kane
1 minute ago, UtahFossilHunter said:

 If you’re in a quarry, steel-toed boots are probably more safe to have than my lightweight hiking boots. You could always try kicking them. I bet a good kick with those would make a bear rethink eating you for a minute. :ighappy:

:hearty-laugh:

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Wrangellian

If you can lift your leg fast enough to have some impact!

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Jesuslover340

Nothing flash, but this is our fossilmobile :)

20190101_111235.jpg

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UtahFossilHunter
5 minutes ago, Jesuslover340 said:

Nothing flash, but this is our fossilmobile :)

20190101_111235.jpg

I like the little awning on it. :PDo you camp in it overnight?

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Jesuslover340
6 minutes ago, UtahFossilHunter said:

I like the little awning on it. :PDo you camp in it overnight?

It's pretty nifty to have. Just rolls/springs back up into a zippered bag that's bolted on. Poles just fold into it and stakes go into a smaller bag that fits inside. It also comes with a wall and floor you can attach, if you so wish. And yes, we have before :P

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UtahFossilHunter
1 hour ago, Jesuslover340 said:

It's pretty nifty to have. Just rolls/springs back up into a zippered bag that's bolted on. Poles just fold into it and stakes go into a smaller bag that fits inside. It also comes with a wall and floor you can attach, if you so wish. And yes, we have before :P

That’s pretty fancy. I’ve slept in the back of my father’s pickup truck before I had my own car to drive and I’ve slept in a tent  but nothing like a tent-SUV combo.

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Jesuslover340

@UtahFossilHunter  Tent-suv combos are pretty common in Australia :)

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UtahFossilHunter
8 minutes ago, Jesuslover340 said:

@UtahFossilHunter  Tent-suv combos are pretty common in Australia :)

Do they keep the creepy-crawlers out alright?

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Ludwigia

I like to hop onto my trusty Rad Rhino when I go to visit the local shark tooth sites. Otherwise it's just hopping into the family car and pulling on my choice of boots when I get to sites which are more distant.

1.jpg.0427114160c1f786bb8d633089b8dc59.jpg

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JarrodB

My Pro-4x, kayak and feet get me everywhere I need to go.  :)

28698612_10209530914150210_4398945858723130030_o.jpg

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UtahFossilHunter
15 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

I like to hop onto my trusty Rad Rhino when I go to visit the local shark tooth sites. Otherwise it's just hopping into the family car and pulling on my choice of boots when I get to sites which are more distant.

1.jpg.0427114160c1f786bb8d633089b8dc59.jpg

E-bikes are so cool! What kind of range does that get?

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UtahFossilHunter
11 hours ago, JarrodB said:

My Pro-4x, kayak and feet get me everywhere I need to go.  :)

28698612_10209530914150210_4398945858723130030_o.jpg

A small truck and a big kayak can give you a fun time before your fun times:ighappy:  I love it!

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Ludwigia
9 hours ago, UtahFossilHunter said:

E-bikes are so cool! What kind of range does that get?

One battery gets about 60 km., but I have 2, so I can do double that distance.

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UtahFossilHunter
6 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

One battery gets about 60 km., but I have 2, so I can do double that distance.

That’s not bad. I was expecting less than that so it’s beat my expectations.:dinothumb:

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