Jump to content
sharko69

Shark Tooth ID Greater Hammerhead?

Recommended Posts

sharko69

I have found three of these teeth and am wondering what type they are. I am thinking Hammerhead but with serrations it would have to be greater hammerhead. These teeth come from Galveston Island and I believe theme to be Pleistocene. We find several types of Carcharhinus species of teeth on the beach along with lemon, tiger, sand tiger and have seen a couple of great whites that another hunter has found. These teeth are much more robust than the Carcharhinus teeth and the nutrient grove is deep and long. Any help is appreciated.

F1745866-3156-44C3-8CE1-6EBEA9B4ED02.jpeg

671324B8-E1F4-4195-AECD-1D9B213EB441.jpeg

8F5AA03F-9449-4F57-897B-F50E6D4028AF.jpeg

4245AC05-2958-4D78-AAFD-A5AE38C883CB.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sharko69

FE1B86A9-E620-4AE6-AD15-003C21146A15.jpeg

E9A089FA-B1F6-4DE4-8C06-477A309A4A4A.jpeg

684F60AA-EB0B-4BB7-870B-3549D955E996.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrR

Lower Hemipristis serra? I'm uncertain of that, and if they would have been around as late as pleistocene. Take it with a grain, as I'm new at this. Good luck.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sharko69
22 minutes ago, MrR said:

Lower Hemipristis serra? I'm uncertain of that, and if they would have been around as late as pleistocene. Take it with a grain, as I'm new at this. Good luck.

 

Thank you. I am certain it is not a Hemi. I appreciate the input though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

Agreed that it is not a Hemi (salt grain taken ;)) but I'm not so sure it is a Hammerhead either. I'm absolutely terrible at identifying fossil teeth in the genus Sphyrna (Hammerhead Sharks) and I'm sure I have lots in my collection that have gone unrecognized. The little I know about teeth from this genus is that they are supposed to have a distinct notch on the distal side that is referred to as the "hammerhead notch". I'm not seeing that on your specimens (other than possibly the third one). The following link may prove informative:

 

https://www.fossilguy.com/gallery/vert/fish-shark/sphyrna/sphyrna.htm

 

I wonder if @Al Dente would like to chime in on this one?

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al Dente

I think they are some type of Charcharhinus. I’ve tried to match them with a modern species but didn’t have much success. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sharko69
4 hours ago, MarcoSr said:

 

Other species of extant hammerhead sharks, in addition to the great hammerhead, can also have serrated teeth.  Below are extant great hammerhead teeth (labial and lingual views) for you to compare your teeth to.  Also below is a link to one of my posts on an extant great hammerhead jaw.  Not all of the above teeth look like great hammerhead teeth but the third tooth does to me:

 

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/64506-extant-sphyrna-mokarran-great-hammerhead-shark-jaw/?p=674826

 

Marco Sr.

 

After looking at your link I am even more convinced they are lower hammerhead teeth. I have some Miocene that I found at STH that show the distinct notch but I see that it is not always present. The Miocene teeth I have also lack serrations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
non-remanié

My first thought agreed with Marco's in that #3 seems most like a  hammerhead.   #2 seemed possibly carchariniform and #1 was the most unique, but most confusing.   Considering everything and accepting that 1 is hammerhead and they are all from the same locality makes me think they likely all are hammerhead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossilguy

For what it's worth, here's my opinion:

 

I would say the first one looks like some kind of  Carcharhinus type shark.  The teeth of  Carcharhinus sp. are highly variable.  The second one doesn't look like a hammerhead to me, it doesn't have the right type of shoulder (in my opinion).   It might also be some type of Carcharhinus variation. 

 

However, the third tooth looks like a typical hammerhead, plus serrations.  Modern ones have serrations, so I wouldn't see why you couldn't find a fossil one with serrations. The root with the 'hammerhead notch' looks like it's just eroded a little bit.

 

I attached a typical hammerhead tooth with I.D. characteristics from my hammerhead page:

https://www.fossilguy.com/gallery/vert/fish-shark/sphyrna/sphyrna.htm

hammerhead-sharktooth-identification.jpg.c5ce4ffe14884c41bea98e11c3aa496e.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sharko69
On 1/7/2019 at 2:50 PM, fossilguy said:

For what it's worth, here's my opinion:

 

I would say the first one looks like some kind of  Carcharhinus type shark.  The teeth of  Carcharhinus sp. are highly variable.  The second one doesn't look like a hammerhead to me, it doesn't have the right type of shoulder (in my opinion).   It might also be some type of Carcharhinus variation. 

 

However, the third tooth looks like a typical hammerhead, plus serrations.  Modern ones have serrations, so I wouldn't see why you couldn't find a fossil one with serrations. The root with the 'hammerhead notch' looks like it's just eroded a little bit.

 

I attached a typical hammerhead tooth with I.D. characteristics from my hammerhead page:

https://www.fossilguy.com/gallery/vert/fish-shark/sphyrna/sphyrna.htm

hammerhead-sharktooth-identification.jpg.c5ce4ffe14884c41bea98e11c3aa496e.jpg

 

Thank you. The reason I did not think Carcharhinus is the robust root and deep nutrient groove. The convex shoulder and “notch” also is not as appearent on the extent examples that Marco SR posted. I am still leaning towards hammerhead, at least for the first and third. Here is an example of a more classic fossil example I found in California.

F1BA9FBE-3103-4F89-BC5A-5BDF28C69986.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sharko69
On 1/6/2019 at 7:02 PM, MarcoSr said:

 

Other species of extant hammerhead sharks, in addition to the great hammerhead, can also have serrated teeth.  Below are extant great hammerhead teeth (labial and lingual views) for you to compare your teeth to.  Also below is a link to one of my posts on an extant great hammerhead jaw.  Not all of the above teeth look like great hammerhead teeth but the third tooth does to me:

 

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/64506-extant-sphyrna-mokarran-great-hammerhead-shark-jaw/?p=674826

 

Marco Sr.

 

Thank you. Great information and examples to compare to. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×