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Innocentx

Thanks! This will be interesting. 

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UtahFossilHunter
24 minutes ago, Innocentx said:

Thanks! This will be interesting. 

It’ll help me go back through the basics and maybe it’ll help someone else learn something new.:dinothumb:

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Hope this doesn't sound rude... Are others allowed to chip in with some papers?

-Christian

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UtahFossilHunter
37 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

Hope this doesn't sound rude... Are others allowed to chip in with some papers?

-Christian

Sure, if you’ve got any, throw them in.:) 

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UtahFossilHunter
8 hours ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

Establishment of Tyrannosaurus as a new, valid genus :) : Osborn(1905)_Tyrannosaurus.pdf

-Christian

That’s a good one. Thanks for adding it!:dinothumb:

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UtahFossilHunter

This is the Spandrels of San Marco and the Panglossian Paradigm: A Critque of the Adaptationist Programme by Stephen Jay Gould and Richard C. Lewontin.

They discuss the problems with the “adaptationist programme” and propose that not only do organisms have pressure from natural selection and adaptation and such but also structural constraints, sometimes even more so. They claim sometimes structural constraints come first and then artwork comes later as a side effect not the other way around. 

 

https://faculty.washington.edu/lynnhank/GouldLewontin.pdf

GouldLewontin.pdf

 

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UtahFossilHunter

This weeks paper is Punctuated Equilibria: An Alternative to Phyletic Gradualism by Niles Eldredge and Stephen Jay Gould.

In this paper, they discuss the problems that phyletic gradualism has when explaining certain species stability over time. Phyletic gradualism is the theory that species gradually morph into other species slowly and surely over time. They also address biases that were prevalent in the Paleontological community back when they were writing this. One bias was that paleontologists would look for evidence of phyletic gradualism and then publish that they had found it in their studies thereby creating a circular argument. They finally propose that there may be another way species evolve and that is through punctuated equilibria. They propose that species evolve from one species to another at rates so quick that may not be fossilized. They also state that when species do speciate, they may be stable and not vary much until pushed to speciate again. 

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/ridley/classictexts/eldredge.pdf

eldredge.pdf

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UtahFossilHunter

How about something a little more recent this week? This one is “Large colonial organisms with coordinated growth in oxygenated environments 2.1Gyr ago” by 

Abderrazak El Albani et al. In this paper they discuss fossils from 2.1 billion years ago that show some kind of multicellularity. When I picture earliest multicellular animals, I imagine the Ediacaran fauna but this paper shows that there may have been multicellular animals billions of years before the Ediacaran.

2.1 Ga Multicellular animals.pdf

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UtahFossilHunter

This week, we’ll do something quite old now. Here is the first comprehensive book on geology, the Principles of Geology by the father of geology himself, Charles Lyell.

http://homepages.see.leeds.ac.uk/~earpwjg/PG_EN/Text/Principles_of_geology.pdf

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UtahFossilHunter

How about something a little more local this week? @Boesse has written a paper that looks at the cause of why megalodon is extinct and when it did go extinct. https://peerj.com/articles/6088.pdf

6088.pdf

 

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UtahFossilHunter

Here's an article about how organisms grow. Some grow body parts at different rates than other parts for example a human head vs spine grow at different rates. Alberch et al. tackle this issue in fossils. https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/2400262.pdf?casa_token=mWguBhWb_1oAAAAA:_9zBmkCJ9UgV4YSs6c08So3mxB2x_mHc-L1jVjukv8RAnyDollC-ie0WojoHMKobJ4Y40rDGzbSxHRsFezLm5nRDP9Td6WjsN9zcKW4ZHN-BP35TNJI 

 

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UtahFossilHunter

This is a paper on the Burgess Shale’s agnostid trilobites. In this paper, they try to determine what the life habits and the anatomy of agnostid trilobites.

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/pdf/10.1098/rspb.2018.2314

rspb.2018.2314

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doushantuo

Hasn't this been posted by Kasia also?

And,I'm guessing,by Piranha?

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UtahFossilHunter
On 3/16/2019 at 6:38 AM, doushantuo said:

Hasn't this been posted by Kasia also?

And,I'm guessing,by Piranha?

I’m not sure. I found this while searching for info on agnostid trilobites and thought it would be a good addition here. I would not be surprised if one of them posted it earlier than I did.

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UtahFossilHunter

I've been fairly busy and haven't gotten around to posting some papers so here's a bunch all at once. 

Here is a wonderful case of when paleontologists go head to head on a subject. This one specifically is on the Burgess Shale with Simon Conway Morris and Stephen J. Gould duking it out.

http://www.stephenjaygould.org/library/naturalhistory_cambrian.html

 

Here is the book Stephen J. Gould is most known for and talks about in that article:

Wonderful Life

http://s-f-walker.org.uk/pubsebooks/pdfs/Stephen_Jay_Gould_Wonderful_Life_The_Burgess.pdf

 

Here is the book Simon Conway Morris talks about in that article as well:

The Crucible of Creation

https://archive.org/details/The_Crucible_of_Creation_The_Burgess_Shale_and_the_Rise_of_Animals_by_Simon_Conw

 

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Bobby Rico
4 minutes ago, UtahFossilHunter said:

Simon Conway Morris

He is a fantastic paleontologists and really enigmatic person. I went to a lecture of this probably 20 years ago. Really interesting.  :dinothumb:

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UtahFossilHunter
1 minute ago, Bobby Rico said:

He is a fantastic paleontologists and really enigmatic person. I went to a lecture of this probably 20 years ago. Really interesting.  :dinothumb:

They're both crazy smart people and I love seeing things like this article that shows even the smartest people disagree on some things. 

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UtahFossilHunter

Two more articles:

Macroevolution in the 21st century

https://paleonet.org/paleo21/mevolution.html

 

Phanerozoic Trends in the Global Diversity of Marine Invertebrates

https://websites.pmc.ucsc.edu/~pkoch/EART_206/09-0120/Alroy et 08 Science.pdf

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UtahFossilHunter

Here’s a couple more.

Seafood Through Time

https://ebme.marine.rutgers.edu/HistoryEarthSystems/HistEarthSystems_Fall2010/Bambach, Seafood thru Time.pdf

 

Delayed fungal evolution did not cause the Paleozoic peak in coal production

https://www.pnas.org/content/113/9/2442

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