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rew

I post 'em and piranha labels 'em.

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rew

This bug has a face only a mother could love.

front-cleaned-cropped-small.jpg

rear-cleaned-cropped-small.jpg

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Jackson g
On 11/17/2019 at 3:33 AM, rew said:

I skipped #69 in my sequence of trilobites so this week's trilobite is #69.  Some trilobites get to be preserved in a light cafe au lait color in near white limestone, like the Acanthopyge and Cyphaspides from Black Cat Mountain.  But many, like this one, are stuck with dark gray shell on medium gray rock.  Life isn't fair, and neither is death.  This is an Early Ordovician Pliomerid trilobite from the Filmore Formation in Utah, Lemureops lemurei.

dorsal-cleaned-cropped-rotated-small.jpg  dorsolateral-cleaned-cropped-small.jpg  front-cleaned-cropped-small.jpg

Love pliomera trilobites. Is this the same species as Pseudocybele lemurei?

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fifbrindacier
On 06/11/2019 at 9:49 PM, rew said:

This bug has a face only a mother could love.

front-cleaned-cropped-small.jpg

rear-cleaned-cropped-small.jpg

:default_rofl:

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rew

I got tired of photographing itty bitty bugs so I put the regular macro lens back on and picked out one of my larger trilobites for this week.

 

This week's trilobite, #85, is a Middle Silurian Homalonotid from the Rochester Shale of Middleport, New York, Trimerus delphinocephalus.  This has the usual features of its family -- a concave face, small eyes, and a smooth carapace with nearly all trilobization lost, all adaptions for a life of burrowing in the mud.  Like many other members of the Homalonotidae it is large, about 16.5 cm long.  In life these trilobites had a high, domed carapace, but as is the case with most Trimerus specimens the carapace got crushed and flattened after the bug died.  As it flattened, it spread out, while the edges got stuck in the mud.  Something had to give, and the results are 90 degree breaks in the carapace at the edges.  This is a common "failure mode" for Trimerus fossils.

dorsal-cropped-rotated-small.jpg

dorsolateral-cleaned-cropped-small.jpg

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rew

Trilobite of the week #86 is one of those Bolivian "no prep" bugs -- they crack open a concretion, and if they're lucky they find a trilobite.  This is Edredgeia eocryphaea, of Devonian age, in the family Calmoniidae.  This trilobite is from the Belen Formation of Calamarca (La Paz) Bolivian Altiplano.  The Calmoniidae are in the same superfamily as the Acastidae, and the resemblance is clear.  Like other members of the Phacopina this has schizochroal eyes with easily visible lenses.

dorsal-cleaned-cropped-rotated-small.jpg

dorsolateral-cropped-small.jpg

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piranha

The species is misspelled in the abstract and a figure description but the correct spelling listed in the systematic paleontology is: Eldredgeia eocryphaea

 

Carvalho, M.D.G.P., Edgecombe, G.D., Smith, L. 2003

New Calmoniid Trilobites (Phacopina: Acastoidea) from the Devonian of Bolivia.

American Museum of Natural History, Novitates, 3407:1-17  PDF LINK

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rew

Okay, corrected.  Thanks

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rew

Trilobite of the week #87 is a humble Middle Ordovician Asaphid from Builth Inlier, Wales: Ogygiocarella debuchi.  The specimen here has the typical flattened preservation.  The main claim to fame of this bug is that it is the first trilobite to be given a scientific description, in 1698 in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.  The author suggested that it was a type of flat fish.

 

dorsal-cropped-rotated-small.jpg

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