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rew

I can't resist adding this one extra super bonus trilobite, the rare and much larger (and cuddlier) subspecies Greenops boothi plushtoyi.  This is only found in a thin layer in Ithaca, New York.

Greenop_boothi_plushtoy.jpg

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Malcolmt

That is awesome.... a well known member of the Fossil Forum that I helped out a few years ago gave my grand daughter one of these and it is still one of her favorites. Because of this Trilobite was one of her first 50 words...... She is now sharing it with her new baby sister.........

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GerryK
11 hours ago, rew said:

This midweek bonus trilobite (#24) is a more common cousin of Bellacartwrightia, Greenops boothi, from the Moscow Shale of Erie County, New York.  It is middle Devonian in age.  This specimen, 27 mm long, is typical size for the species.  It shares its rock with a piece of horn coral, a reminder that back in the Devonian upstate New York was a shallow tropical sea, south of the equator.

dorsal-small.jpg   whole-plate-small.jpg

This trilobite is a Greenops barberi, not a Greenops boothi

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DevonianDigger
11 hours ago, rew said:

I can't resist adding this one extra super bonus trilobite, the rare and much larger (and cuddlier) subspecies Greenops boothi plushtoyi.  This is only found in a thin layer in Ithaca, New York.

Greenop_boothi_plushtoy.jpg

 

That's not true, we also have them at Penn Dixie. $15 a piece, they're found in the Gift Shop member of the Windom, lol.

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sharkdoctor

Great thread and a great project idea! I can't wait for the next installment!

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rew
3 hours ago, GerryK said:

This trilobite is a Greenops barberi, not a Greenops boothi

 

The difference between those two species appears to be primarily in the length of the pygidal lappets, with G. boothi having them longer.  It isn't clear to me where my specimen lies.

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rew
7 hours ago, DevonianDigger said:

 

That's not true, we also have them at Penn Dixie. $15 a piece, they're found in the Gift Shop member of the Windom, lol.

 

I stand corrected.  Greenops boothi plushtoyi has a wider distribution than was previously reported in the literature.

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piranha
5 hours ago, rew said:

The difference between those two species appears to be primarily in the length of the pygidal lappets, with G. boothi having them longer.  It isn't clear to me where my specimen lies.

 

Greenops boothi: terminal pygidial lappet broad anteriorly, subrectangular, convex posteriorly                         

Greenops barberi: terminal pygidial lappet developed as narrow (tr.) sharply pointed triangle

 

Lieberman, B.S., Kloc, G.J. 1997
Evolutionary and biogeographic patterns in the Asteropyginae (Trilobita, Devonian) Delo, 1935. 
American Museum of Natural History Bulletin, 232:1-127  PDF LINK

 

image.thumb.png.451e84318c1b7039a4713930a5029530.png

 

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rew

When I read that paper I have to concede that my bug comes a little closer to G. barberi.  But when I look at various alleged G. boothi and G. barberi specimens on the internet, there's very little consistency.

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DevonianDigger
1 hour ago, GerryK said:

There is much confusion on the internet about Greenops and some of the identifications are not reliable.  There are only 2 species of Greenops in Western New York, G. grabaui in the Wanakah Shale and G. boothi in the Windom Shale. As one goes eastward in NY the stratigraphy changes dramatically. The Hamilton Group thickens and many more units are present and mutable species of Greenops occur there.  Greenops does occur in NY but only in Eastern NY in an unnamed unit between the Kashon Shale and the Windom Shale.

 

 

Where does the G. barberi fit into the equation then?

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GerryK
9 minutes ago, DevonianDigger said:

 

Where does the G. barberi fit into the equation then?

Sorry, thanks for pointing out my error. Corrections are made and now it's OK.

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rew

Trilobite #25, the official Trilobite of the Week, is another member of the Acastidae, this one of Eifelian age from Jebel Issoumour, Morocco -- Morocconites malladoides.  I'm pretty sure I got the species right this time because it's the only one in the genus.  This one is famous for the upturned rostrum.   The right eye isn't perfectly preserved but the lenses that are there are easy to see, as is typical of the schizochroal eyes found in the Phacopina.

dorsal-cropped-rotated-small.jpg

dorsolateral-right-small.jpg

right-eye-small.jpg

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ynot

You sure do have a nice "bug" collection.:trilowalk::trilo::thumbsu:

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