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autismoford

Okay so I found this specimen at the Taughannock Falls in Ithaca New York. I found it at the edge of the gorge which consists of Shale, composed of slit and clay that fell onto lime mud and hardened into rock. I've done some research and it appears to be a Brittle star trace fossil formed by their arm grazing the sand floor. Although, these Brittle Star fish traces are known as "Pteridichnites biseriatus" and they have only been discovered so far in upper Devonian shales out in western and eastern Virginia. I'm not an expert but to my knowledge the Ithaca geological formation is Devonian and was slowly covered by sand. Is it possible that the Brittle Star fish once roamed in the ancient sea now known as "Taughannock falls" today? Because a research team is trying to find this specimen and they are wondering if anyone has discovered it. 

Edit: Im referring to the dotted trackway. check this link out for more information.  http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/news/Pteridichnites.htm20190114_163615.jpg

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autismoford

Full image of shale. The first image was taken closely at the trace fossils. 

 

20190114_163634.thumb.jpg.9beb46ac8b0bf0d439e54206a4ca81aa.jpg

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ynot

There sure is a lot going on in this piece. I see several different types of tracks.

However, none look like the disorganized tracks left by brittlestar movement.

Lets see what @abyssunder thinks.

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autismoford
17 minutes ago, ynot said:

There sure is a lot going on in this piece. I see several different types of tracks.

However, none look like the disorganized tracks left by brittlestar movement.

Lets see what @abyssunder thinks.

http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/news/Pteridichnites.htm

check this out. It resembles what I found. 

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ynot

From a google search for "brittlestar tracks", notice the distinct difference.

image.jpeg.f90bf3435a7cbf2f781ad447c925c11c.jpegImage result for brittlestar tracks

I think the assumptions made by the page You linked are wrong. They are not brittlestar tracks in My opinion.

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autismoford
6 minutes ago, ynot said:

From a google search for "brittlestar tracks", notice the distinct difference.

image.jpeg.f90bf3435a7cbf2f781ad447c925c11c.jpegImage result for brittlestar tracks

I think the assumptions made by the page You linked are wrong. They are not brittlestar tracks in My opinion.

If they were wrong what trackway could it be from? Because this type of trackway was assumed to be from a brittle star fish according to multiple paleontologists. It is most likely caused by only the arm/tentacle grazing the sea floor opposed to the whole body as you pictured. Very few information is known regarding this type of trackway and it has only been observed in limited locations of Devonian shale in Virginia. 

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ynot
5 minutes ago, autismoford said:

Because this type of trackway was assumed to be from a brittle star fish according to multiple paleontologists.

 

From the page You linked....

"This track is thought (by us) to have been produced by a marine organism, most probably a brittle starfish. "

This sounds like a guess to Me. Where is the evidence to back it up?

 

The track they show looks much like tracks that have been attributed to trilobite feeding traces in My opinion.

 

12 minutes ago, autismoford said:

It is most likely caused by only the arm grazing the sea floor opposed to the whole body as you pictured. 

How did You determine this?

What happened to the other arms while this track was being laid down by one arm?

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autismoford
2 minutes ago, ynot said:

From the page You linked....

"This track is thought (by us) to have been produced by a marine organism, most probably a brittle starfish. "

This sounds like a guess to Me. Where is the evidence to back it up?

 

The track they show looks much like tracks that have been attributed to trilobite feeding traces in My opinion.

 

How did You determine this?

What happened to the other arms while this track was being laid down by one arm?

Good point. although, there are multiple of these traces assuming that they are the other arms. I guess in the end we will never know. But this was a prediction as I said.   

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Wrangellian

I'm with ynot... your item looks like the one in the link, but I doubt it is brittle star. Looks more like trilobite (Cruziana) or something similar (bilaterally symmetrical).

Nice specimen, whatever it is!

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abyssunder
19 hours ago, autismoford said:

If they were wrong what trackway could it be from? Because this type of trackway was assumed to be from a brittle star fish according to multiple paleontologists. It is most likely caused by only the arm/tentacle grazing the sea floor opposed to the whole body as you pictured. Very few information is known regarding this type of trackway and it has only been observed in limited locations of Devonian shale in Virginia.

Please see above the underlined passage.

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sTamprockcoin

Regarding these "only being found in Virginia"  do you have a sourceor is it an assumption based on a type locality description? I'd have to disagree since I've found them in 2 different Brallier outcrops in Blair County PA. 

 

When I posted a link to the same paper I got a good education on the tentative nature of trace fossil origins. Keep looking, researching, & asking ?s.

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