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Dinoguy89

Is This A Tyrannosaurus Rex Tooth?

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Dinoguy89

Hi guys, 

 

I've collected fossils for many years but would like some advice on a particular tooth. I'm very cautious when it comes to T-rex teeth, mainly because of the price tag that comes with it. I own 3 t-rex teeth, but for 2 of them I was there on the private dig when we found it so I know for sure the I.D of the tooth and the fact we had a paleontologist there to confirm it. There's this tooth I've found and it's currently being listed as a trex tooth but it doesn't have some of the characteristics of your typical t-rex tooth. It's not massively thick etc. I know you can get some nice sized nano teeth but this tooth is just over 2.5 inches. It was sourced directly from the Javelina Formation in Texas. The tooth itself has most serrations intact and its enamel is phenomenal.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thank you in advance.  

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Runner64

Hmm this is an interesting tooth because it’s from the Javelina formation. It is Maastrichtian in age which is the same as the Hell Creek. It also has T-Rex reported from it. However, looking at the cross-section, the compression reminds me of Nanotyrannus teeth so maybe a new find from the formation?

 

Also the way the tooth curves looks a little “off” perhaps ask if there’s any restoration on it.

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Dinoguy89
1 minute ago, Runner64 said:

Hmm this is an interesting tooth because it’s from the Javelina formation. It is Maastrichtian in age which is the same as the Hell Creek. It also has T-Rex reported from it. However, looking at the cross-section, the compression reminds me of Nanotyrannus teeth so maybe a new find from the formation?

 

Also the way the tooth curves looks a little “off” perhaps ask if there’s any restoration on it.

Thank you for the reply, I would way too bug to be Nano, or if it is it's extremely rare, being at over 2.5 inches. I will ask thanks and yes it's the formation that gets me. 

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Macrophyseter

Welcome to the forum! :)

 

As far as I know, Nanotyrannus can be differentiated from Tyrannosaurus in that the former has its tooth base more box-shaped. I believe that this tooth has it, making it likely to be Nanotyrannus IMO, especially based on this photo: 

Screen Shot 2019-01-16 at 04.38.58.png

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Dinoguy89
8 minutes ago, Macrophyseter said:

Welcome to the forum! :)

 

As far as I know, Nanotyrannus can be differentiated from Tyrannosaurus in that the former has its tooth base more box-shaped. I believe that this tooth has it, making it likely to be Nanotyrannus IMO, especially based on this photo: 

Screen Shot 2019-01-16 at 04.38.58.png

Thank you :) i've just never heard of one being this size but I guess it's not overly huge. Thanks for your opinion. The seller said that the paleontologist who discovered it said it was a t-rex, he got it directly from them. Regardless it's still a nice tooth :D

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mburkett

Awesome tooth and VERY interesting. I could see arguments for either species. Maybe @hxmendoza can chime in...

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TyBoy

You need to be sure it's from the Javelina fm and not the Aguja Fm which is adjacent to it and older.  Slender, narrow appearance gives me concerns it's a Daspletosaurus or Gorgosaurus tooth.  

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Dinoguy89
8 hours ago, hxmendoza said:

The box shape does not necessarily rule out rex. This tooth has a stout rectangular cross section. This can and is found in the maxillary teeth of T. rex.

 

Also there is no pinching of each lateral side near the base as is seen in Nanotyrannus.

 

Though there are no clear pictures showing both anterior and posterior serrations, everything else about this tooth says subadult Tyrannosaurus rex.

 

The pictured T. rex specimen at the South Dakota School of Mines, which I have looked at up close and personal, has maxillary teeth that match the rectangular cross section shape of this tooth. 

84595DCC-416C-4E17-AAD2-C9589E925177.jpeg

Thank you for your input, love the photograph as well!

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