Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Rockwood
57 minutes ago, Innocentx said:

It may be a type of wrapping growth pattern I or we are unfamiliar with??

I think that's it.

Vegatative is quite distinct from wood as one might envision it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie
3 hours ago, Innocentx said:

I find this unexplainable using either theory, slickensides/fibers or wood. :headscratch:

It may be a type of wrapping growth pattern I or we are unfamiliar with??

Me too! I'm in the stepped slichenside with calcite slichenfibres camp but cant find another example like it with the fibres running at 90 degress to each other. My friend has contacted the National Museum of Scotland who have put him in touch with a specialist in fossil wood, he's sending them a sample so hopefully they will be able to confirm if it is indeed wood or not.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot
1 minute ago, Archie said:

, he's sending them a sample so hopefully they will be able to confirm

Looking forward to seeing what they say.:popcorn:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie

I'll post again as soon as I get those pics or anything new comes to light, thanks for your input so far everyone much appreciated! :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DPS Ammonite

Archie, is there more the one layer (orange) that is 90 degrees to the main fibrous layer? In other words, are there more than two layers that are stacked on top of each other at 90 degrees? It is unlikely that even two layers would be perfectly 90 degrees to each other let alone several layers without the whole thing being organic (plant).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobWill

It looks a lot like this piece I found at the Pennsylvanian site in Jacksboro Texas. That's a mm scale.

 

WIN_20180915_20_38_56_Pro.jpg.7cc7b42e9de5d78fb8de6baa57ec6db3.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

To quote the peanuts characters  THAT"S IT ! :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

Another place I've seen this pattern is in the exaggerated ray structure in the wood on the under side of a large horizontally oriented oak limb. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
supertramp

maybe a radial plane of fossil wood?

 

cut3.gif.3bd4b027115b6ee3f9b3dec85da166ad.gif

oakblk2.jpg.fb410bfc5a60b1cc8330c3e99504f05c.jpg

"A block of oak wood showing the tangential plane (T) and the radial plane (R). The parallel lines on the radial side are annual rings. The blotches of cells at right angles to the annual rings are rays (ribbonlike aggregations of cells extending radially through the xylem tissue).

 

https://www2.palomar.edu/users/warmstrong/trjuly99.htm

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot
13 hours ago, BobWill said:

It looks a lot like this piece I

Yes, but what is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
2 hours ago, supertramp said:

maybe a radial plane of fossil wood?

Thanks. My specimen would be hard to photograph in the middle of a blizzard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan
22 hours ago, Archie said:

I'm still waiting to get the pics of the polished section and a close up of the contact between the object and the matrix but heres another couple of pics showing the object in-situ closer up (unfortunately the cliff face is highly weathered) and another couple of pics of the surface under magnification showing the rods, we didnt measure them at the time but from memory they are less than 1mm in diameter.

 

thumbnail_0102-02.jpg

thumbnail_0102-05.jpg

I am very much in the plant camp.

These remind me of a type of Calamities a bit.

Here is a piece of Calamities tree trunk I have. Granted it doesn’t have the strong crosshatch running perpendicular. This one is from Arkansas.

9C82AAB4-65F7-4D4A-A6B9-C0DA47A686BC.thumb.jpeg.4ca9a9d176fec4b0c534842055357e2f.jpeg

 

Regarding plant material in sandstone. I have found beautifully preserved pet wood in sandstone, ironstone concretions.

These are examples of calcite slickenside that I have. 

E89F15B7-A43D-4C5F-B54B-F58F762A69AB.thumb.jpeg.e7e928251382f041e7c429d0977fa0d5.jpeg

 

This is pet wood in situ found in sandstone on the left of the pic. Eocene in age.

A6439AD0-53C4-408F-966F-380A10905091.jpeg.b261986a54b0e12c74390f4c74b628df.jpeg

 

These all came from sandstone. The one on the far left is the same as the one above. Some look like modern pine wood but are fossilized.

74D9F7C2-D09B-498A-B787-5FB8CF12D812.thumb.jpeg.b0950b216d17389676a17b874c10dfe2.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobWill
3 hours ago, ynot said:

Yes, but what is it?

Ahh, well that question was already (not quite) answered in this thread:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie
18 hours ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Archie, is there more the one layer (orange) that is 90 degrees to the main fibrous layer? In other words, are there more than two layers that are stacked on top of each other at 90 degrees? It is unlikely that even two layers would be perfectly 90 degrees to each other let alone several layers without the whole thing being organic (plant).

It is many layers stacked on top of each other, the small fragment my friend showed me under magnification was at least half a dozen layers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie
17 hours ago, BobWill said:

It looks a lot like this piece I found at the Pennsylvanian site in Jacksboro Texas. That's a mm scale.

 

WIN_20180915_20_38_56_Pro.jpg.7cc7b42e9de5d78fb8de6baa57ec6db3.jpg

 

It does look very similar to this piece in structure! It seems this is carbonised though while my friends specimen (at least the surface of it) seems to be calcite which I don't understand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie

Also it doesn't seem like this piece was ever positively ID'd in that thread and even though its carbonized I'm still struggling to see how it could be vegetative? I feel like the only wood I've ever seen that's anything like it is plywood, I'm really puzzled over this! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot
1 hour ago, Archie said:

the only wood I've ever seen that's anything like it is plywood, I'm really puzzled over this! 

Your not the only one puzzled by this.:headscratch::headscratch:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

Here's an attempt at the oak limb ray structure.

IMG_4938 (2).JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

I'm not arguing that it's oak wood, just the concept of the growth pattern. Perhaps some earlier plants had a more robust mechanism for producing it ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobWill
Just now, Rockwood said:

I'm not arguing that it's oak wood, just the concept of the growth pattern. Perhaps some earlier plants had a more robust mechanism for producing it ? 

Is can see where you are going with this but the lines that are crossing on the oak board seem to be superimposed so you can see both together. Archie's mention of plywood got me thinking about how the layers are placed with the grain running in opposite directions for strength so I had a second look with that in mind. The layers in Archie's do alternate the grain direction but not in mine. It's the edges where part has broken away that run cross-ways to the grain in my sample so these may not be so similar after all. Archie's broken away edges are not as straight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie

0120-01.jpg

0120-02.jpg

0120-03.jpg

0120-05.jpg

0120-06.jpg

0120-07.jpg

0120-08.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

 

7 minutes ago, BobWill said:

the lines that are crossing on the oak board seem to be superimposed so you can see both together.

It's a little out of focus, but it shows the layering of the rays better. They just aren't as densely packed. 

IMG_4937 (2).JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie

Heres some close ups of the matrix on the back of the piece, my friend still thinks this is sedimentary i.e. a conglomerate formed in a  high energy river while I still think it is volcanic. 1mm scale rule.

0120-01.jpg

0120-03.jpg

0120-11.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan
9 minutes ago, Archie said:

 

0120-02.jpg

0120-03.jpg

 

These structures don’t look anything like calcite to me and look a lot like plant cellular structures. 

It is a very interesting piece.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
8 minutes ago, Archie said:

Heres some close ups of the matrix on the back of the piece, my friend still thinks this is sedimentary i.e. a conglomerate formed in a  high energy river while I still think it is volcanic. 1mm scale rule.

There can sometimes be a fine line between sedimentary and volcanicly caused rapid sedimentary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×