Jump to content
PSchleis

Is this bone material?

Recommended Posts

PSchleis

Found on Myrtle Beach. I've been picking up a lot of bone that is quite obvious to me in its look and texture, but this is a strange piece and I'm not convinced it's bone at all. The only reason I haven't given up on it is because it has two colors - the outside is black, the inside is brownish.

 

Thoughts?

P1110884.thumb.JPG.de2b3a12e5149044c7a7ef3ee5127a14.JPGP1110886.thumb.JPG.e8435640216eb98247f331bc3f873bbd.JPGP1110887.thumb.JPG.520453cfda1da62f792410d6ae7772c0.JPGP1110889.thumb.JPG.e66b81717c8e95e7ad44eb81f3dfe693.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

Not bone.

Non fossil rock.

Minerals in a rock can oxidize when exposed and make the surface a different color than the inside (in this case most likely an iron compound).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PSchleis
6 minutes ago, ynot said:

Not bone.

Non fossil rock.

Minerals in a rock can oxidize when exposed and make the surface a different color than the inside (in this case most likely an iron compound).

Excellent. Thank you, Ynot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plax

I would say it's a piece of either Peedee or Goose Creek Limestone that was a hardground at some point and got phosphatized (blackened). This can be seen in local quarries but seeing a piece in the surf makes it difficult to recognize. Rip up clasts in basal lags also get the blackened treatment and are often associated with vertebrate concentrations such as shark teeth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

I can't really identify anything, but I get a sense there may be fossils (marine invertebrates) in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

Right there.

P1110886.thumb.JPG.e8435640216eb98247f331bc3f873bbd_LI.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plax

I agree with Rockwood. Giving it a wack with a hammer, if you should so decide, might expose some index fossils so we could ID the rock. Some small Anomia species are typical of the Peedee and Carolinapecten eboreas walkerensis is an index for the Goose Creek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×