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Terry Dactyll

Fossil Prep Workshop

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MikeD

Thanks for the tips.

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Nicholas

I pinned this topic because it is very useful to new aspiring preppers. You've done an excellent job Terry.

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fossisle

Terry

What coatings do you use to finish your ammonites?

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Dicranurus

Thanks Terry for the useful guide.

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fosceal2

Wow I really enjoyed this article! As a small jewelry store owner I would like to share the regret I have that we did not buy a silent compressor! My husband,the jeweler,has equipment that runs on an air compressor and it is REALLY NOISY!

Fosceal

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fig rocks

Thank you Terry for the wonderful knowledge that you have shared! :)

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Eureka

Terry,

Thanks a lot for your detailed explanation. it is an unbelievable bible for a begginner preparator.

You should film your fossil preparations and...who knows, distributing them between all fossil lovers.

Cheers, ;)

Eureka

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Bear

Very nicely done, sir. Thank you for sharing with us. :)

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siteseer

... Using stil saws is quite dangerous, so its important you fully understand all the safety requirements before you start, and its also noisey and dusty... so wear eye and ear protection and follow all the safety precautions....

Yes, no matter what you're doing while prepping, always wear eye protection. It's not just the dust, flying rock particles, and solvents. One time, I was cleaning off some glue with a scalpel, pressing harder than I thought, and the tip of the blade snapped, bouncing off the left eyepiece of my safety glasses before I realized what happened.

It's easy to downplay the dangers and push your luck but your number will come up someday. Just put your glasses on each time you prep and be ready.

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Nicholas

Good advice, I once slipped with my rotary tool which had a metal cutting disk in it. I had a very nasty wound on my hand on it for some weeks afterward.

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barefootgirl

Thanks!:)

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djasper

Very helpful...Thank you :D

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grampa dino

I love your work and the fossils

That was a very good read.

Did you Know that here in Alberta

One needs a permit to do any type of work

on any fossil even just washing could be a big NO NO

What are if any the regulations in your world

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davehunt

Thanks Terry for this detailed post.

Dave

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Terry Dactyll

Cheers for the kind comments....

grampa dino..... ''What are if any the regulations in your world''?....you own what you find basically, and as a consequence can decide whats happening to the fossil...

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bigjohn835

How did you know that other fossil was below? I am always amazed by the ability of people on here to look at a rock, (that I would pass over), and know that there's a fossil under there. Most fossils I prep, never seem to be in one piece. Most comes off really easy, then it just stops.

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glacialerratic

Amazing find and great prep/restoration work!

Thanks for putting this thread up -- very informative.

Do you know if there's ever been an articulate Arthropleura found? Or are all the finds pieces, reconstructed?

Truly an awesome arthropod!

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Terry Dactyll

michigantim..... I agree, I love it to.... Just a quick google on the web shows very little 'actual fossil material' about.... although this looks a fair chunk of one below....

http://bestiarium.kryptozoologie.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/Arthropleura-armata-Saarland-1024x768.jpg

and

http://www.yale.edu/ypmip/taxon/arthro/36259.html

I would imagine with the animal having a large bodymass and conditions (rainforest-like) with the humidity of the enviroment it begain to break down and decay very quickly after death, so finding any pieces at all is quite a rarity..... mainy you see reconstructions.... some more convincing than others.... this one is my favoroute....

http://www.geology.cz/aplikace/fotoarchiv/sobr.php?r=700&id=14570

Heres another bit I found..... a leg in a siderite nodule....

post-1630-12616647556588_thumb.jpg post-1630-12616648475411_thumb.jpg

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