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Dermotthefossilhunter

What shark tooth is this

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Dermotthefossilhunter

Found this shark tooth in Apollo bay Victoria Australia any ideas on what it is?

image.jpg

Edited by Dermotthefossilhunter
Picture didn’t show size

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Manticocerasman

do you know the age of those deposits, this would help to narrow it down. 

also the size of the shark tooth.

At first glance I suspect a Carcharodon Hastalis but I have to little info to be sure.

 

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Dermotthefossilhunter

The age of deposit is unknown sorry but I will get some pictures of it next to a ruler

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Dermotthefossilhunter

Here is a picture of the back of it I also edited the picture from before and it’s just under 4 cm

image.jpg

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Manticocerasman

@Paleoworld-101 has collected fossils at this location, mebey he could help with this.

 

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digit

Yup. @Paleoworld-101 might be a good source of information for fossils in this area. I'm not sure if the fossil deposits in Apollo Bay are similar to the formation in Beaumaris to the east. If they share a similar age, this document may be of some use:

 

http://www.iubs.org/fileadmin/user_upload/Other-Publications/XXVIII._Appendix_F_Fossil_report_for_Heritage_Listing_Jan_2016.pdf

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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WhodamanHD

Definitely C. hastalis or a very worn C. carcharias.

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Macrophyseter

I agree with either worn great white or C. plicatilis

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Paleoworld-101

Strange that you would find this tooth there, the Apollo Bay area is Cretaceous in age but this is definitely a Cenozoic tooth. As others have said, looks to be a worn C. hastalis, assuming it never had serrations but if it did have serrations and they have simply worn off it would be C. carcharias. I would guess it has been washed some distance to arrive in that area! 

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Connah

+1 for C.hastalis. 

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Macrophyseter
6 minutes ago, Paleoworld-101 said:

Strange that you would find this tooth there, the Apollo Bay area is Cretaceous in age but this is definitely a Cenozoic tooth. As others have said, looks to be a worn C. hastalis, assuming it never had serrations but if it did have serrations and they have simply worn off it would be C. carcharias. I would guess it has been washed some distance to arrive in that area!

Considering it's super pretty worn down, I'd also agree with a possible rework if Apollo bay is indeed Cretaceous.

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