Jump to content
MrBones

Crinoids and corals?

Recommended Posts

MrBones

I found these fossils on Jebel Hafeet, Al Ain, UAE. The second rock looks like there is a criniod in it, but is more possibly a type of sponge. The first rock has quite a few things in it, including some type of coral. I would like to know what these really are.20190202_173846.thumb.jpg.6df0a458d4874994dc3e093ab058a738.jpg20190202_174410.thumb.jpg.63f55d4302d0c05242a178956b5bbae1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Cropped and brightened: 

 

20190202_173846.jpg.e786b1cfd888d3051e04aa32ad02a466.jpg   20190202_174336.thumb.jpg.37c9e4089b9f8f4830bc2e53a1fbf326.jpg  20190202_174410.jpg.82190a325f37007b01f25c0e276ae381.jpg

 

These do not look like crinoids, to me. :unsure:

Maybe branching bryozoans on the first items.

Not sure on the second, but possibly some sort of orthocone cephalopod?  :headscratch:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrBones

Crinoids were more of a hopefull thought:unsure:

Thanks of the id.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

I think 1 is a branching tabulate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrBones

Do you think number 2 is some sort of urchin spine? I have found quite alot of ecinoid fossils here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
3 hours ago, MrBones said:

Do you think number 2 is some sort of urchin spine? I have found quite alot of ecinoid fossils here.

I have almost no experience with urchins, but I would be more inclined to say it is also a branching tabulate. At the lower end it seems to have the right shapes to be coralites, and the fracture pattern is right. I have a basketball sized chunk of broken pieces like this fused into a big mass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrBones

Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coco
To find out if it is a sea urchin thorn, we need photos much closer (with size) ; with the current photos I can't pronounce myself.
 
Coco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fifbrindacier

I agree with @Coco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
1 hour ago, Coco said:
To find out if it is a sea urchin thorn, we need photos much closer (with size) ; with the current photos I can't pronounce myself.
 
Coco

 

1 hour ago, fifbrindacier said:

I agree with @Coco

Both my assessments are probably influenced by the fact that many of my specimens of the coral are poorly preserved and in similar looking rock.

I totally agree that more detail in the photos is needed to have confidence in the identification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrBones

There are no holes. The surface is almost smooth. It has a almost flat point.20190219_142241.thumb.jpg.1c0deb0339d06820a3e4957feec5e424.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

:shrug::headscratch:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

:headscratch:. . .  It seems like I was wrong about something like this before. That time I believe the consensus was crinoid spike, or spine. (something like that)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abyssunder

It will be good to know what is the geological age of the sediments holding your finds. Maybe they are from the Cenozoic? :shrug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×