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Gavin

Mammoth tooth?

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Gavin

This was found on my property in Ellis county Texas.

Ellis county has history of mammoth fossil and we might of thought this part is a piece of a mammoth tooth?

 

5c567570da810_Screenshot_20190202-2257412.thumb.png.64e7537cd677a05f85ca1cda2f4303bf.png

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Gavin

Yeahhhh, most likely, you don't always find mammoth teeth in your yard :) we we're just making the best of the situation, lol

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DevonianDigger

+1 for Inoceramus

 

As far as I'm concerned it doesn't matter what fossil it is. If you're finding it in your own backyard it's awesome!

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KimTexan

It would be helpful to learn your formations and geological periods. It has helped me a lot. It takes time to learn though and you have to have something to help you along.

My favorite tool is the Mancos iPhone app. If you don’t have an iPhone there is also the Rockd app, but Mancos far outweighs Rockd in terms of functionality and usefulness in my opinion.

 

Mammoth would not have been found in the Cretaceous. They were found in the Cenozoic era predominantly in the Pleistocene, but I believe existed into the early Holocene.

The clam is from the Austin Chalk which is in the upper Cretaceous. The Austin Chalk correlates with the European stages of Conician, Santonian and the lower Campanian.

 

These may be helpful to you.

ChronostratChart2018-08.jpg

 

This one is specific for the Texas Cretaceous.

ED9843A6-4617-435C-8AA2-B269E34A3703.thumb.jpeg.0f2777e01e8317737430cbb99b577b76.jpeg

 

 

 

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Gavin
16 minutes ago, KimTexan said:

It would be helpful to learn your formations and geological periods. It has helped me a lot. It takes time to learn though and you have to have something to help you along.

My favorite tool is the Mancos iPhone app. If you don’t have an iPhone there is also the Rockd app, but Mancos far outweighs Rockd in terms of functionality and usefulness in my opinion.

 

Mammoth would not have been found in the Cretaceous. They were found in the Cenozoic era predominantly in the Pleistocene, but I believe existed into the early Holocene.

The clam is from the Austin Chalk which is in the upper Cretaceous. The Austin Chalk correlates with the European stages of Conician, Santonian and the lower Campanian.

 

These may be helpful to you.

ChronostratChart2018-08.jpg

 

This one is specific for the Texas Cretaceous.

ED9843A6-4617-435C-8AA2-B269E34A3703.thumb.jpeg.0f2777e01e8317737430cbb99b577b76.jpeg

 

 

 

What exactly is Cretaceous, I know it's ameteur but gotta start somewhere. I really appreciate these detailed explanations from everybody!

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DevonianDigger

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DevonianDigger

Sorry, I thought that would be an image when I posted it. Check out this reference on the geologic time scale.

 

Even though I don't like to use Wikipedia as a reference, this seems to do a pretty good job of covering it:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geologic_time_scale

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DevonianDigger

The short answer is that the Cretaceous period was the time period from roughly 145 million years ago up until approximately 65 million years ago. 

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Gavin

Thank you for explaining, plus the link!

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Rockwood
3 hours ago, Gavin said:

What exactly is Cretaceous

In practical terms for you it means your place was still under the western interior seaway.

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