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JBMugu

Help to ID shark tooth from Bakersfield

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JBMugu

Hello,

found this tooth in the Round Mountain Silt formation in Bakersfield this weekend. The tooth had serrations, but they are worn down. At first I thought the tooth was a small meg, or a large hemi.

Upon closer inspection it does not seem to fit either of those species well. The root is not consistent with that of a meg nor a hemi.  Now I am thinking it could be some kind of Requiem shark. What do you guys think?

 

DF4F511D-68E5-4F15-8F90-94D7709BCE86.jpeg

663D2C6D-30C5-49CF-A685-7454153D7127.jpeg

54103354-4762-4602-AAF5-DB76E8751649.jpeg

103B3F3A-DEE4-42EE-8443-DBF792B4F480.jpeg

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ynot

Carcharhinus obscurus (LeSUEUR, 1818)
Dusky shark
Very scarce in the STH fauna. (according to elasmo.)

 

 

Edit- missed this one by a mile ao two.:doh!::blush::blush:

Change My opinion to agree with the common consensus of a meg.

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KimTexan

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ynot

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caldigger

My resources show the Dusky being 1/8" -3/4" in size and having a very defined nutrient groove in the center of the root.

I'm no expert, but the thickness on this guy screams Meg. to me 

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sixgill pete
52 minutes ago, digit said:

Not to question Tony on a fauna he knows infinitely better than me but that would be a whomping big Dusky Shark tooth. The thickness of this tooth and the faint appearance of a bourlette in the first photo had me leaning to a small (young or posterior) meg tooth. Willing to be educated. ;)

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

I agree with Ken on this. Undoubtedly a small or young worn meg to me.

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JBMugu
45 minutes ago, caldigger said:

My resources show the Dusky being 1/8" -3/4" in size and having a very defined nutrient groove in the center of the root.

I'm no expert, but the thickness on this guy screams Meg. to me 

 

I agree, this is probably too big for a dusky. However, as far as I know megs at STH are mature adults sharks. I have never seen a juvenile tooth from this location.

 

Here are a slightly better pictures that I think show a very worn nutrient groove in the center of the root (maybe?). 

P7510615.jpg

P7510616.jpg

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JBMugu

The other thing that bothers me and makes me think its not a meg is the back of the tooth seems to be domed towards the center near the root. All of the other STH megs I have are flat or recessed at the back of the tooth near the root.

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Bronzviking

When I saw the first pics before the comments I thought baby meg. Very nice tooth and find! @JBMugu

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Dinoguy89

Thickness and general look of the tooth says Meg to me, where you found it could have once been a shallow breeding ground, I have a few teeth that are in this size range. Regardless nice tooth :) 

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Al Dente

The unusual serrations made me think serrated Alopias but I don’t know if they have ever been found at this location. Might be too thick for that.

B65670F4-B008-47AA-894C-897F065B8542.png

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digit

Alopias ?latidens? is reported as rare from the faunal list. After more exposure to this rare genus of fossil shark teeth in North Carolina, I had this on my (expanded) list of considerations as well. The curvature didn't seem to be there and the thickness and the appearance of what seems to be a bourlette swayed me to considering meg. Posterior megs tend to have a larger root to blade ratio but maybe a more lateral tooth from a smallish individual might result in a tooth of this size and shape.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Al Dente

I would have said megalodon if it wasn’t for the unusual serrations. I’ve never seen these on a meg.

FE1F30FD-8EAC-4979-BF93-79CB1A26E00E.jpeg

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Darktooth

Maybe pathological?

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MarcoSr

I'm not seeing a worn nutrient groove in the pictures.  Juvenile megs can have irregular large serrations.  My sons and I have a number of juvenile megs like that.  All of the features that I can see in the pictures match a juvenile meg.

 

Marco Sr.

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JBMugu
5 hours ago, Al Dente said:

I would have said megalodon if it wasn’t for the unusual serrations. I’ve never seen these on a meg.

FE1F30FD-8EAC-4979-BF93-79CB1A26E00E.jpeg

That's one of the things I find interesting about this tooth. The pictures don't do it justice, when I see the pictures it looks like a Meg. When you get it in your hand it looks off. To bad it's so worn, I would love to see it whole. I might take it to the Buena Vista museum and see what they think.

 

 

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NSRhunter

Hubbell Meg :)

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siteseer

I have to agree that it's a baby megalodon.  I have one from Bone Valley that has the same kind of inflation to the crown - the unusual thickness.

 

I've seen three baby megs from the STH Bonebed.  I have one that Bill Hawes found in the 80's.  Bob Ernst found one that I recall but that one could have been the second one he collected.  The tooth in question is the third.  Hang on to that one, JBMugu!

 

Jess

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fossilselachian

Agree with Siteseer

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