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Vera

fossil in marble

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Fossildude19

They look like cross sections of Orthocone cephalopods. 

 

post-6760-0-69354400-1316044651.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

Weird! 

And very interesting. 

How big are they?

Could be cephalopod shells.

Hello, and a very warm welcome to TFF from Morocco.:)

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Misha

Look like nautiloids to me as well.

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aplomado

Awesome find!

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Al Dente

I'm pretty sure this one is a high spired gastropod.

snail.jpg

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Ludwigia

I'll go along with Al Dente. If those pillars are Jurassic limestone/marble, then that would rule out orthocone nautiloids.

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caterpillar

Maybe Nerineidae

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Fossildude19

 

1 hour ago, Ludwigia said:

I'll go along with Al Dente. If those pillars are Jurassic limestone/marble, then that would rule out orthocone nautiloids.

 

I'd be inclined to agree, if we had any reliable location information, or scale of the fossils.  :zzzzscratchchin:

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Herb

look more like gastropods to me also

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Vera

the length of fossil at first picture is app 5 cm, second and third picture app 10-15 cm.

 

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ynot

I am in the cephalopod camp on these.

I can see no evidence of the spiral core of a gastropod shell in these pieces.

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fifbrindacier

Well, it could be an orthocone or a Nerinae as said Caterpillar, but i think it will be hard to tell more. I won't choose a camp on this one.

 

And a warm welcome on :tff: from France.

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abyssunder

Now we have approximate dimensions, but we don't know the provenance of the red marble.
What is sure, is that the geological age is Jurassic (Lias - Malm) in any cases, even if it was imported from the adjacent countries (Austria, Poland, Hungary, Romania, or Italy) and was not quarried in Slovakia.

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ynot
1 hour ago, abyssunder said:

What is sure, is that the geological age is Jurassic (

I think I missed something here.:headscratch:

How was this determined?

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abyssunder
18 minutes ago, ynot said:

How was this determined?

in my research

This document may reveal more insides of the "red marble", I think. :)

Edited by abyssunder

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Carl

Just FYI: The stone industry and geologists use different terms for rock types. Most in the stone industry are marketable names and often, unfortunately, crookedly overlap, the geology terms. If is has fossils in it it almost can't be a marble, which is metamorphosed to the point of usually destroying any contained fossils. Most shell-packed commercial stones are limestones.

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abyssunder

Here are some images of  fossiliferous "red marble" (nodular red limestone) plates from the metro station Politehnica, Bucarest, Romania.

 

25637379433_5b8e799cc2_k.jpg.606058183fbbe8a3189f8626e533a782.jpgmedia-148648869383661900.thumb.jpg.d84c10e7b4f7d386bbb7735a74f67fb0.jpgfosile-in-marmura.jpg.91d2977a443f5026c006153f7119649d.jpgmelc.jpg.7daf0b89c842b833e2ca63a8c8a88b7f.jpgpolitehnica-subway-station-1-3.jpg.127f850805b7af6bdf6e4e9e212eb160.jpgpolitehnica-subway-station-2-3.jpg.76d15223cb44abc74d3f174fd9241efb.jpgstilet.jpg.7a275b28078af288cee90fa511d8ac0f.jpg

 

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DPS Ammonite
12 minutes ago, abyssunder said:

Here are some images of  fossiliferous "red marble" (nodular red limestone) plates from the metro station Politehnica, Bucarest, Romania.

 

25637379433_5b8e799cc2_k.jpg.606058183fbbe8a3189f8626e533a782.jpgmedia-148648869383661900.thumb.jpg.d84c10e7b4f7d386bbb7735a74f67fb0.jpgfosile-in-marmura.jpg.91d2977a443f5026c006153f7119649d.jpgmelc.jpg.7daf0b89c842b833e2ca63a8c8a88b7f.jpgpolitehnica-subway-station-1-3.jpg.127f850805b7af6bdf6e4e9e212eb160.jpgpolitehnica-subway-station-2-3.jpg.76d15223cb44abc74d3f174fd9241efb.jpgstilet.jpg.7a275b28078af288cee90fa511d8ac0f.jpg

 

@FranzBernhard The first two photos (and others) look like rudists. What do you think?

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FranzBernhard

@DPS Ammonite, thanks for tagging, I would have missed this very, very nice rocks!

Yes, @abyssunder presented many rudist rocks, mostly with hippuritids. Very nice! Someone knowledgeable could even give proper names to it, they are very nicely preseved.

 

2 hours ago, Carl said:

The stone industry and geologists use different terms for rock types.

Oh yes! Every carbonate rock, that can be polished, is a marble for the stone industry. But this is very, very old usage, much older then geology as science. Just two different worlds.

Like minerals: completely different things to mineralogists and nutritionists.

Franz Bernhard

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fifbrindacier
18 hours ago, FranzBernhard said:

@DPS Ammonite, thanks for tagging, I would have missed this very, very nice rocks!

Yes, @abyssunder presented many rudist rocks, mostly with hippuritids. Very nice! Someone knowledgeable could even give proper names to it, they are very nicely preseved.

 

Oh yes! Every carbonate rock, that can be polished, is a marble for the stone industry. But this is very, very old usage, much older then geology as science. Just two different worlds.

Like minerals: completely different things to mineralogists and nutritionists.

Franz Bernhard

I agree, those are very nice rudists. I can't imagine a mineralogist considering he could eat his minerals for the good effects for his body and saying Something like "Yum, that iron is so tasty".

I know a Quarry of morello cherry marble and also qualified morello cherry marble in the geologic file of the Bureau de Recherche Géologique et Minière, which is very fossiliferous whith a huge amount of goniaties and some orthocones.

IMG_20180902_171921.thumb.jpg.6c0a9fede3d67b26e9efec24d791fdfe.jpg

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abyssunder

Very nice example, Sophie! :)

 

1 hour ago, FranzBernhard said:

Yes, @abyssunder presented many rudist rocks, mostly with hippuritids. Very nice! Someone knowledgeable could even give proper names to it, they are very nicely preseved.

Mr. conf. dr. Mihai E. Popa from University of Bucharest said that the red nodular limestone probably was extracted from the Gilău mountains, Săvădisla locality,

and is very abundant in rudists with the genus Vaccinites, Hippurites and Radiolites. The geological age may be Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian).

 

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fifbrindacier
2 hours ago, abyssunder said:

Very nice example, Sophie! :)

 

Mr. conf. dr. Mihai E. Popa from University of Bucharest said that the red nodular limestone probably was extracted from the Gilău mountains, Săvădisla locality,

and is very abundant in rudists with the genus Vaccinites, Hippurites and Radiolites. The geological age may be Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian).

 

Thank you, i would have liked to bring some back home but when i hammered it, i haven't been able to scratch a millimeter.

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abyssunder
24 minutes ago, fifbrindacier said:

Thank you, i would have liked to bring some back home but when i hammered it, i haven't been able to scratch a millimeter.

Probably they are hard as stone, diagenetically transformed, in my thinking. :)

 

like this rudist in my personal find, but it's grey

100_4584.thumb.JPG.2c8cc12665dc6c1a84487a726fec87e7.JPG

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