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Roberto B

Teeth

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Roberto B

Hi everyone,

 

Here I've two teeth, which seems -as you can see by the color- to be fossils or sub-fossils.

I found them in a beach of a volcanic lake (Central Europe), where there aren't sedimentary formations, so I suppose they are not older than the lake itself (the collapse of the caldera and the formation of the lake are dated between 400,000 and 150,000 years ago).

 

Do you think they could be recent fossil or subfossil?
Which kind of animal?

 

They are 3 and 2 cm long.

2.jpg

1.jpg

3.jpg

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Darktooth

The one with the bigger chewing surface looks similar to a pig or boar. But the dimensions  you gave seem too small for such unless it was a juvenile or baby. I am not an expert, so let's see what others have to say.

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jcbshark

I would say pig as well @Harry Pristis but Harry is an expert:) 

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Harry Pristis

 

They both appear to be teeth of a domestic pig.

 

 

pig_sus_scrofa_m2_m3.JPG

pig_sus_scrofa_occlusal.JPG

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Roberto B

Thank you very much for the replys.

 

I'm wondering if put them in my collection or not.
They seems completely remineralized, really like a pleistocene fossil, but could they also be very recent?

Do you think that in the sediments of a lake they can become fossils or sub-fossils even in a few years? Or do they need centuries or thousands of years to be in this condition?

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Plax

given the age range these are Pleistocene fossils.

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Harry Pristis
2 hours ago, Plax said:

given the age range these are Pleistocene fossils.

 

What age range are you referencing?  These are "float" teeth with no date range beyond a fuzzy "domesticated by" date, later than Pleistocene.

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Plax

I took the op range of dates dates for origin of the lake as most likely for the origin of the teeth. They don't look modern to me. Am assuming they eroded out of lake deposits. You have much more experience than I Harry so if you think they are modern pig teeth I'll defer to your judgement.

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Roberto B

The period that I proposed is only for the base dating: I mean that they can't be older than the formation of the lake, but they can be recent.

 

So my question is: even for bones and teeth like these -which seem Pleistocene fossils- we can not rule out that they are recent (also very recent, e.g. few centuries), if we do not know the sediment of origin?

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Darktooth
5 hours ago, Roberto B said:

The period that I proposed is only for the base dating: I mean that they can't be older than the formation of the lake, but they can be recent.

 

So my question is: even for bones and teeth like these -which seem Pleistocene fossils- we can not rule out that they are recent (also very recent, e.g. few centuries), if we do not know the sediment of origin?

Even  recent teeth can become mineralized  in a rather short period of time if the conditions are right.

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